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Abies concolor  white fir
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Abies concolor

(white fir)

Plant description coming soon.
Abies grandis  grand fir
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Abies grandis

(grand fir)

Grand indeed. Glossy, dark green needles and a symmetrical form make this native fir one of our choicest conifers. Native from coastal Sonoma County, just south of the Russian River, north to British Columbia and east to the Rockies. Grows up to a foot a year and is not suitable for the small garden. Plant in full sun along the coast but protect from hot afternoon sun in the interior. Occasional deep waterings are required when young. Combines well with redwoods and bigleaf maples. Often used as a Christmas tree.
Abies magnifica  red fir
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Abies magnifica

(red fir)

Plant description coming soon.
Acer  circinatum  vine maple
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Acer circinatum

(vine maple)

Deciduous shrub or tree 5 to 20 ft. tall, native to moist woods and streambanks in the coastal mountains of northern California to British Columbia. Attractive in all seasons: bare reddish twigs in winter, delicate lobed leaves in spring and summer, and good color in autumn. Wonderful in the woodland setting, under tall conifers where its fall color will stand out. A natural with ferns and other woodland plants that receive dappled to part shade and regular to moderate summer water. Can be espaliered too.
Acer glabrum  Sierra maple
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Acer glabrum

(Sierra maple)

Plant description coming soon.
Acer macrophyllum  bigleaf maple
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Acer macrophyllum

(bigleaf maple)

This stately and picturesque tree is native to stream banks and moist canyons from Southern Alaska to the foothills of California. A large, round-topped tree with large dark green lobed leaves and smooth silver-gray bark. Fast growing 30 ft or more tall. One of the few native trees to offer good fall color. Sun to partial shade, occasional to regular water. When planting in a sunny location, protect the trunk from sun-scald with a dilute application of white latex paint. Deer resistant.
Acer negundo  box elder
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Acer negundo

(box elder)

The box elder at maturity features a broad canopy supported by thick branches and a wide, gray trunk. In spring, the silky pink inflorescences hang from the tips of the branches as the leaves begin to emerge. Quickly grows to a height and width of up to 50 ft. Often used as a restoration plant in riparian zones. Full sun to part shade. Enjoys regular moisture. Deer seem to leave it alone once established.
Achillea  'Moonshine' yarrow
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Achillea 'Moonshine'

(yarrow)

Great long blooming yarrow with bright lemon-yellow flowers above mounds of soft silvery leaves. This very attractive foliage makes it a great addition to borders and mixed plantings. Full sun with moderate watering. Deer resistant.

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Achillea ageratifolia

(Greek yarrow)

Native to the Balkans, this sturdy perennial forms dense mats of attractive silver-grey foliage, 4 - 6 inches tall and 18 inches wide. Prolific bloomer, with clusters of small white flowers in the late spring. This handsome perennial makes a fine addition to a rock garden or perennial border, where it thrives in full sun and is drought tolerant once established. Trim back spent flowers to keep tidy. Pollinator favorite. Fire and deer resistant.
Achillea  filipendulina 'Coronation Gold' fernleaf yarrow
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Achillea filipendulina 'Coronation Gold'

(fernleaf yarrow)

A sturdy perennial forming a mat of large, fern-like leaves spreading to 3 ft. wide. Flat topped, bright golden-yellow flowers up to 4 inches wide appear on long stems 2 - 3 ft. high. Make excellent cut flowers both fresh and dried. This selection is noted for being more compact than the typical species. Plant in full sun with moderate to little summer water. Yarrows are a good nectar source for bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects. Tough and drought tolerant. Deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'Calistoga' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'Calistoga'

(yarrow)

Featured in California Native Plants for the Garden, this selection of native yarrow is from the rugged Palisades above the Napa Valley. Silver gray foliage is topped with creamy white flowers around 1 ft. tall. Its growth is more restrained than many selections of yarrow. Attractive to pollinators. Best with sun, good drainage, and moderate to little summer water. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'Desert Eve Yellow' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'Desert Eve Yellow'

(yarrow)

Exceptionally compact, hybrid yarrow with fragrant, grey-green, ferny foliage. Showy, flat-topped clusters of mustard yellow blossoms rise 18 inches above the spreading basal foliage. The stiff flower stems make excellent cut flowers, fresh or dried. Blooming over a long period, this easy to grow perennial attracts a wide array of beneficial insects including bees and butterflies. Plant in full sun with moderate to occasional watering. Cutting back old flowers encourages rebloom. Leaving flowerheads to age provides seed for birds. Deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'Island Pink' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'Island Pink'

(yarrow)

A color variant of the normally white California native yarrow from Santa Cruz Island. Dark green ferny foliage topped with clusters of bright pink flowers on 18 inch stems over a long period. Sun to partial shade, occasional to moderate water. Good habitat value, providing nectar for bees and butterflies. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'King Range' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'King Range'

(yarrow)

The seed for this selection of our native yarrow was from the aptly named Windy Ridge above the scenic mouth of the Mattole River. The parent plants were very stout with foot tall stems and huge inflorescences of creamy white. It has been very vigorous in cultivation so far. Best with sun, good drainage, and moderate summer water. The foliage is deer resistant.

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Achillea millefolium 'Point Cabrillo'

(yarrow)

A delightful form of our local yarrow with wide clusters of soft pink flowers held on stalks reaching 2 feet high. Large, fern-like leaves of green spread quickly to form broad drifts. Selected from Point Cabrillo on the Mendocino coast. Blooms from spring through autumn. Plant in full sun and water occasionally once established. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'Red Velvet'
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Achillea millefolium 'Red Velvet'

This yarrow is getting rave reviews for its deep-red flowers produced atop grey-green ferny foliage. Spreading 2 foot or so wide with flowers rising 2 – 2 ½ feet tall. Best in full sun with moderate to occasional watering. Popular with bees and butterflies. Often deer resistant.

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Achillea millefolium 'Shell Beach'

(yarrow)

A selection from the Sonoma coast of our native yarrow discovered by Mostly Natives Nursery. The flowers are a clear white on stalks reaching a height of about 1 foot. Similar to the selection ‘Sonoma Coast’ but with slightly smaller flower clusters and subtly grayer leaves. Blooms from spring through fall. Give full sun and water occasionally once established. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'Sonoma Coast' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'Sonoma Coast'

(yarrow)

This is a local selection from the Sonoma County coast near Salmon Creek. Bright green foliage is topped with white flowers in dense heads on compact stems to around 1 ft. tall. Can bloom over a long period, spring through fall, depending on conditions. Best in sunny areas with some summer water, though it is drought tolerant.  Flowers attract butterflies and other insects. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea  millefolium 'Terracotta' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'Terracotta'

(yarrow)

This hybrid yarrow forms a mat of grey-green ferny foliage 2 - 3 ft. wide with interesting earth-tone color flowers. The long lasting flower clusters simultaneously sport peachy-yellow tones through burnt orange, on sturdy non-floppy stems to around 2 ft. tall. Plant in full sun with moderate to occassional summer water once established. Bees and butterflies love yarrows, but they are not deer favorites. Excellent cut flowers too.

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Achillea millefolium var. steensii

(Steens Mountain yarrow)

Tucked away in southeastern Oregon is an ancient ridge known as Steens Mountain. From those decaying glacial cirques comes this special little yarrow. Distinctive for its low,dense green foliage and short flower stalks reaching a height of about 6 inches. The flowers are white with umbels about two inches wide. Blooms from spring through autumn. A useful diminutive yarrow for the rock garden or small space. Doesn’t spread as aggressively as its lowland kin but forms nice dense mats. Provide full sun and water occasionally once established. Deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium - inland form - Lake County seed source  yarrow
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Achillea millefolium - inland form - Lake County seed source

(yarrow)

A vigorous and easy to grow perennial, yarrow grows native throughout California in many plant communities. This crop is grown from seed collected from a hot inland site in Lake County. In this form, flower stems rise 18 inches above the gray ferny foliage bearing white flowers in flat topped clusters. Plant in a sunny location with moderate to a little water. Spreads by rhizomes and can form sizable clumps if happy. A good addition to the habitat garden where the flowers provide nectar for bees and butterflies and the foliage provides winter forage for birds. The foliage is deer resistant.  
Achillea millefolium - inland form - Napa County seed source  yarrow
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Achillea millefolium - inland form - Napa County seed source

(yarrow)

A vigorous and easy to grow perennial, yarrow grows native throughout California in many plant communities. This crop is grown from seed collected from a hot inland site in Napa County. In this form, flower stems rise 18 inches above the gray ferny foliage bearing white flowers in flat topped clusters. Plant in a sunny location with moderate to a little water. Spreads by rhizomes and can form sizable clumps if happy. A good addition to the habitat garden where the flowers provide nectar for bees and butterflies and the foliage provides winter forage for birds. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium - inland form - Sonoma County seed source  yarrow
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Achillea millefolium - inland form - Sonoma County seed source

(yarrow)

A vigorous and easy to grow perennial, yarrow grows native throughout California in many plant communities. This crop is grown from seed collected from a hot inland site in Sonoma County. In this form, flower stems rise 18 inches above the gray ferny foliage bearing white flowers in flat topped clusters. Plant in a sunny location with moderate to a little water. Spreads by rhizomes and can form sizable clumps if happy. A good addition to the habitat garden where the flowers provide nectar for bees and butterflies and the foliage provides winter forage for birds. The foliage is deer resistant.

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Achillea millefolium - Montara Mountain form

(yarrow)

We discovered the parent of this giant seed strain on the lower slopes of Montara Mountain in San Mateo Co.. With broad, white flower clusters reaching up to 4 ft. high, this is the largest yarrow we've encountered. While seedlings can vary, we have high hopes for this new introduction. Give full sun and moderate to infrequent irrigation. Potentially an excellent spreading perennial for a tall meadow. Attracts all sorts of pollinators. The green, fuzzy leaves are usually considered to be deer resistant.  

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Achillea millefolium - Tomales Point form

(yarrow)

Extremely large leaves up to 10 inches long distinguish this form from most other local yarrow selections. While most yarrow from our coastline have very green leaves, this strain is remarkably gray.  From spring through autumn, large white flower clusters sit upon stalks about 2 feet in height. Water occasionally in areas away from the coast and provide full sun. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea tomentosa  woolly yarrow
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Achillea tomentosa

(woolly yarrow)

Native to southern Europe, this species forms a dense, evergreen, spreading mat of fuzzy olive-green leaves. Early summer brings bright golden-yellow flowers in flat topped clusters on 6-8 inch stems.  Best in a well-drained soils in full sun. Moderate to occasional water once established. Excellent rock garden subject, small scale ground cover or edging plant. Good in containers too. Deer resistant and pollinator friendly.
Achillea x lewisii 'King Edward' dwarf woolly yarrow
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Achillea x lewisii 'King Edward'

(dwarf woolly yarrow)

Low carpet forming perennial with fragrant olive-green foliage, spreading to around one foot wide. Spring time brings butter-yellow flowers on short stems which rise 6 inches or so above the dense mat of foliage. The dwarf size makes it a good candidate for edging, rock garden or container planting. Requires good drainage, full sun with moderate watering. Attractive to bees and butterflies. Deer resistant.    
Actaea rubra  baneberry
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Actaea rubra

(baneberry)

Native to moist wooded plant communities throughout the Coast Ranges and the Sierra Nevada. The attractive astilbe-like foliage emerges in the early spring. The tiny white flowers have no petals and are made up of clusters of creamy white stamens. The spikes of vivid, shiny red berries are very showy though poisonous - hence the common name baneberry. A wonderful addition to shady situations with some summer water. Goes dormant in the winter. Deer resistant.

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Actaea rubra - white fruited form

(baneberry)

This is the special white fruited form of the more commonly seen red fruited baneberry. We are not sure how true these will come from seed and suspect there will be some red berries showing up in this crop. So far we have had only white fruits coming from this seed source, but we will have to see how the entire crop develops. Baneberry is a wonderful woodland plant and easy to grow in shady locales with some summer moisture. The foliage is astilbe-like and late spring brings tall flower stems topped with white flowers that have no real petals and are made up of clusters of creamy white stamens. The showy and VERY POISONOUS fruits follow, hopefully in this case white, but may be shiny red. Dies back to the ground in the winter. Deer resistant.
Adenostoma fasciculatum  chamise
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Adenostoma fasciculatum

(chamise)

Chamise is found on the poorest soils in hot, dry, exposed areas of chaparral plant communities.  Bright green needle-like leaves cover this evergreen shrub.  Late spring brings showy plumes of creamy white flowers in small dense sprays, persisting as they age to reddish brown. This tough shrub can grow 3-10 ft tall and wide depending on conditions. An excellent erosion control plant for tough sites where it holds soil, provides cover for wildlife and acts as a nurse plant, paving the way for the other species to get started.  Plant in full sun with no water required once established. Deer resistant.
Adenostoma fasciculatum v. prostratum  prostrate chamise
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Adenostoma fasciculatum v. prostratum

(prostrate chamise)

An interesting form of a rugged native shrub that inhabits hot dry rocky slopes of the chaparral. This rare and unusual form, from Santa Cruz Island grows into a low mound 3 - 4 ft. wide with dark green needle-like leaves. Small creamy white flowers in dense spikes decorate the branch tips in summer. A natural for dry sun drenched slopes where it will require no supplemental water once established. 
Adiantum aleuticum  five-finger fern
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Adiantum aleuticum

(five-finger fern)

Five finger fern provides a delicate, airy, fresh effect in the shade garden. Easy to grow with regular water and humusy soil. Does well in containers too. Fronds form finger-like patterns on handsome black stems up to 1 and 1/2 feet tall.  Somewhat winter deciduous.  Combine with wild ginger, redwood sorrel, leopard lilies and sword fern for a handsome woodland garden.  Deer resistant.
Adiantum capillus-veneris  southern maidenhair fern
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Adiantum capillus-veneris

(southern maidenhair fern)

A lacy and delicate looking fern with arching dark stems that carry bright green fan-shaped leaflets.  A wonderful addition to a woodland garden or any shady space where it is easy to grow as long as it receives regular water.  Lovely in containers or raised beds, on a shady bank or border, along the north side of a building.  Can grow as much as 1 1/2 ft. tall and wide.  Southern maidenhair can be grown through much of California except for high mountain areas.  Goes winter dormant with cold.  Deer resistant.

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Adiantum pedatum

(five fingered fern)

A beautiful fern with black stems and bright green fan-shaped fronds.  Growing 1 – 2 ft. tall and wide, producing an airy effect in the woodland garden.  Requires good drainage and regular water in a shady location.  Good container subject too.  Cut back old fronds in the winter, making way for the fresh new fiddleheads.  Deer resistant.
Adiantum x tracyi  Tracy's maidenhair fern
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Adiantum x tracyi

(Tracy's maidenhair fern)

A naturally occurring cross between Western five finger and California maidenhair fern.  Offers a delicate lacy effect with gorgeous bright green fronds on black arching stems.  One of the parents is winter dormant, the other, summer dormant, with the resulting hybrid being evergreen.  Easy to grow with shade, woodsy soil and summer irrigation.  Excellent container plant too.  Deer resistant.
Aesculus californica  Californica buckeye
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Aesculus californica

(Californica buckeye)

Beautiful in all its seasons, this native tree is perfectly adapted to our summer dry climate.  Broad headed, deciduous tree rapidly growing to 15 feet or more with smooth grey bark and a rounded shapely habit.  Bright green palmate leaves unfurl in the spring.  Striking, fragrant white to pink flowers in long spikes are followed by pear shaped fruits that split open to reveal large chestnut-brown shiny seeds dangling from branch tips.  Buckeyes lose their leaves in summer to avoid the long dry season. Adaptable and tolerant of a wide range of conditions.  Sun to light shade, little to no water once established.  Flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds, butterflies and native bees.
Agastache  'Blue Boa' hummingbird mint
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Agastache 'Blue Boa'

(hummingbird mint)

From Terra Nova Nurseries in Oregon, this stunning hybrid has won awards at a number of plant trials. Growing 2-1/2 ft. tall and 2 ft. wide with fragrant foliage and flowers of deep violet-blue. The large and sturdy terminal flower spikes dazzle mid to late summer into fall and are highly attractive to hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. Best in full sun with good drainage. Drought tolerant, but happiest with moderate to occasional summer water. Deer resistant. 
Agastache  'Coronado Red' hummingbird mint
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Agastache 'Coronado Red'

(hummingbird mint)

Agastaches are rewarding perennials with fragrant foliage and abundant flowers, which are highly attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies. ‘Coronado Red’ has a vertical growth habit with silvery foliage to 2.5 ft. tall and 2 ft. wide. Spikes of orangy-red flowers bloom over a long period in the summer delighting the hummingbirds. Requires good drainage and full sun with moderate to occasional summer water. Deer resisitant. 
Agastache  'Kudos Mandarin' hybrid anise hyssop
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Agastache 'Kudos Mandarin'

(hybrid anise hyssop)

The "Kudos" line of hybrid Agastache were bred for compact habit, earlier blooming, increased cold hardiness and resistance to downy mildew. Fragrant, lush foliage on compact stems growing 16 - 24 inches tall x 24 inches wide. Rosy-orange tubular flowers bloom over a long period in summer and are highly attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Requires good drainage and full sun with moderate to occasional water. Good container subject too. Deer resistant.
Agastache  'Kudos Silver Blue' hybrid anise hyssop
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Agastache 'Kudos Silver Blue'

(hybrid anise hyssop)

The "Kudos" line of hybrid Agastache were bred for compact habit, earlier blooming, increased cold hardiness and resistance to downy mildew. 'Silver Blue' produces an abundance of lavender-blue tubular flowers on lush fragrant foliage growing 16 - 24 inches tall x 24 inches wide. The flowers are highly attractive to a wide array of pollinators including bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Grow in full sun with good drainage and moderate to occasional watering. Deer resisitant.  
Agastache  'Poquito Butter Yellow' hummingbird mint
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Agastache 'Poquito Butter Yellow'

(hummingbird mint)

This Agastache has a low, compact, bushy habit, growing 10 inches tall and 15 inches wide. Blooms freely June through September with dense flower clusters of butter yellow. The showy flowers are highly attractive to pollinating insects and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun with moderate watering. Drought tolerant once established. Deer resistant. 
Agastache  'Rosy Giant' hummingbird mint
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Agastache 'Rosy Giant'

(hummingbird mint)

Sturdy, long blooming perennial, this Agastache mexicana hybrid was introduced by Suncrest Nursery. Lemony scented foliage to about 2 ft. tall. Erect flower stems rise 5-6 ft. with bright rose pink tubular flowers in dense heads summer into fall. Plant in full sun with good drainage and moderate water once established. Highly attractive to hummingbirds. Deer resistant.
Agastache aurantiaca 'Apricot Sunrise' orange hummingbird mint
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Agastache aurantiaca 'Apricot Sunrise'

(orange hummingbird mint)

Evergreen perennial 2-3 ft. by 2-3 ft. tall and wide. Many spikes of soft orange tubular flowers over a long period, summer - fall. Best in full sun with moderate to regular water once established. Lovely lemon-scented foliage. Deer resistant.
Agastache  foeniculum  anise hyssop
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Agastache foeniculum

(anise hyssop)

Native to the upper Midwest and Great Plains of North America, this upright, clump forming perennial is a willing grower. Reaching 2 -4 ft. tall and wide with aromatic, anise-scented foliage. Terminal spikes of lavender-purple flowers mid to late summer are highly attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Finches love their seeds. Has a long history of medicinal uses and as a seasoning and tea. Plant in full sun to light shade with decent drainage and regular watering. A strong reseeder. Deer resistant.
Agastache urticifolia  licorice mint
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Agastache urticifolia

(licorice mint)

Plant description coming soon.
Agoseris grandiflora  California dandelion
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Agoseris grandiflora

(California dandelion)

Plant description coming soon.

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Agrostis scabra

(ticklegrass)

  Native to middle and high elevation forests and meadows throughout California, this small bunchgrass forms dense tufts of blue-green foliage about six inches high with airy inflorescences rising another eighteen inches.  Works well in a meadow planting or in a container.  Combine with other small perennials such as Grindelia and yarrow or plant in large masses to show off the delicate grass flowers.  Needs regular moisture and full sun to light shade.  Deer resistant.  
Allium unifolium 'Wayne Roderick' single leaf onion
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Allium unifolium 'Wayne Roderick'

(single leaf onion)

An adaptable and easy to grow native onion with handsome blue-green foliage. Late spring brings beautiful lavender-pink flowers on tall stems 6 - 8 inches tall. The flowers on this selection have a particularly appealing saturated color. Fairly water tolerant, often found on seasonally moist and heavy soils. Spreads vigorously. Goes dormant after bloom and will tolerate dry conditions at that time. Deer resistant. Named for internationally known bulb expert and native plant horticulturist, Wayne Roderick, who gave us this plant many years ago.
Alnus incana ssp. tenuifolia  mountain alder
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Alnus incana ssp. tenuifolia

(mountain alder)

Plant description coming soon.
Alnus rhombifolia  white alder
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Alnus rhombifolia

(white alder)

From creeks and rivers throughout California, the white alder rapidly grows to become a large tree, reaching to 50 ft. or more at maturity. Serrated green leaves produce an excellent canopy above the straight, silvery-gray trunk. In winter, when the leaves have fallen, the ghostly branches make a striking silhouette with dangling catkins from the branch tips. An excellent plant for creek restoration where its aggressive roots help to stabilize banks. Keep away from irrigation pipes and foundations. Needs regular moisture and sun to light shade.
Alnus rubra  red alder
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Alnus rubra

(red alder)

Plant description coming soon.
Amelanchier alnifolia  serviceberry
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Amelanchier alnifolia

(serviceberry)

A common native shrub or small multi-trunked tree often found growing along seasonal streams. Serviceberries provide a touch of autumn color at Annadel State Park where the leaves turn a lovely butterscotch yellow. The white spring flowers are followed by dark blue-purple fruits coveted by ring neck doves in the wild. Sun to partial shade. Moderate to infrequent water.
Amorpha californica var. napensis  false indigo
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Amorpha californica var. napensis

(false indigo)

A lovely and uncommon native shrub of the pea family, occasionally seen in woodland and chaparral communities in the coast ranges around the San Francisco Bay Area. Offering a delicate, airy quality, this deciduous shrub grows 2-6 ft. tall. Intricate flowers are closely set on slender spikes and are made up of a tiny intense indigo-purple petal with protruding bright orange stamens, charming on close inspection. This rare and threatened shrub is the larval food source for the California dogface butterfly, our state butterfly. Bees and butterflies nectar on the flowers as well. Best in lightly shaded areas with little to no summer water needed once established.
Anaphalis margaritacea  pearly everlasting
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Anaphalis margaritacea

(pearly everlasting)

An adaptable plant with silver-green leaves that are densely white and woolly beneath. The flowers appear in summer and are made up of pearly white papery bracts surrounding yellow centers. The “straw flowers” retain their shape and color and are often used in dried arrangements. Tolerant of almost any soil type, it prefers full sun where it will grow in moist to somewhat dry conditions. Can spread vigorously, perhaps best used in meadow plantings or other naturalistic settings. Grows 1 - 3 ft. tall and spreading. Dies back to the ground in the winter. Larval food source for the painted lady and American lady butterflies. Deer resistant.
Anemone  deltoidea  western white anemone
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Anemone deltoidea

(western white anemone)

Rhizomatous perennial native to coniferous forests in the coastal mountains of Northern California through Washington. Forming low colonies, 6 inches or so tall with slender stems holding three leaflets. Simple, pure white flowers with a central shaft of anthers hold themselves just above the foliage. Spreads vigorously and best used with shrubs, ferns or other sturdy subjects.  Can romp over smaller perennials. Sweet addition to the woodland garden where it will grow in full to part shade with regular to a occasional summer watering. Good in containers too. Dies back to the ground in winter.  
Anemopsis californica  yerba mansa
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Anemopsis californica

(yerba mansa)

An unusual plant - native to wet areas, but adaptable to regular or moderate garden water. The low rosettes of leaves spread into attractive colonies. The white flowers, or actually, flower bracts, are very showy in late spring. Sun to light shade with moisture. Herbalists use roots and leaves for a topical antibiotic and other uses.

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Angelica arguta

(sharptooth angelica)

A remarkable form of this native mountain Angelica with striking bluish-gray foliage. Umbrella-shaped clusters of white flowers sit on stalks up to 6 feet in height. Needs moderate irrigation and dappled shade inland. Combine with native Heleniums, lilies and columbines to create a beautiful woodland flower patch. Great for native pollinators. A larval food source for the anise swallowtail butterfly.
Angelica breweri  Brewer's angelica
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Angelica breweri

(Brewer's angelica)

From the Sierras and the Klamath mountains comes this elegant member of the carrot family.  Clear white flowers perch like little stars in flat-topped clusters up to 10 inches wide.  Flower stalks can reach 6 feet in height with green serrated leaves forming 2 foot tall mounds at the base.  Enjoys dappled shade away from the coast and moderate water.  Great for native bees and butterflies.  A larval food source for the anise swallowtail butterfly.
Angelica californica  California angelica
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Angelica californica

(California angelica)

Striking stalks up to 6 ft. tall hold flat topped clusters of white flowers above low growing emerald-green leaves. This uncommon member of the carrot family needs only occasional water once established. Naturally occurs under the dappled shade of oaks where it cohabitates with ferns, hound's tongue,yerba buena and woodland strawberries. Excellent for attracting beneficial insects. May go summer dormant when allowed to dry out.
Angelica hendersonii  bluff angelica
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Angelica hendersonii

(bluff angelica)

Found in nature on the immediate coast, though well adapted to the watered inland garden. It has the overall look of a stout cow parsnip with creamy white flowers in umbels and pinnately compound leaves of a deep green. Like many umbels, it is a good nectar source for beneficial insects. 4-5 ft. tall. Full sun to light shade. Good drainage with moderate summer water.
Angelica lucida  sea watch
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Angelica lucida

(sea watch)

Large white flower clusters up to one foot across are held on stalks up to 5 feet tall above coarsely dissected leaves.  Greener leaves and a more refined character distinguish this species from the more common Angelica hendersonii.  While it is rare on the sea cliffs of northern California, sea-watch has a large distribution along coasts throughout the northern hemisphere.   Give regular moisture and part shade in areas away from the coast.  Attracts bees and butterflies.      
Angelica tomentosa  foothill angelica
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Angelica tomentosa

(foothill angelica)

An inland angelica found in more or less moist, lightly shaded places, usually on serpentine. An important plant for the Pomo for its many medicinal and shamanistic uses. To about 5 ft. tall with handsome pinnately compound gray-green leaves. Good drainage and moderate water in the garden with a late summer rest (low water).
Antennaria rosea  rosy pussy toes
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Antennaria rosea

(rosy pussy toes)

A charming, native, mountain dweller which grows among rocks and onto boulders at meadow edges. Forms low mats only a couple of inches high of woolly, gray leaves that creep and cascade. Short flower stems with small, creamy-white and rosy-pink papery bracts, bloom summer into fall. Plant in full sun to very light shade with good drainage and a little summer water. Good addition for the pollinator garden and is the larval food source for a number of butterflies including the American lady. This is one of the few natives which is so low growing you can plant it between stepping stones.
Apocynum cannabinum  Indian hemp
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Apocynum cannabinum

(Indian hemp)

Native throughout much of North America, California and our own Santa Rosa Valley.  Grows 3 ft. tall and spreads vigorously by roots to form large patches. Small white flowers in summer.  Turns beautiful shades of yellow in the autumn then dies back to the ground in the winter.  Good for wild meadow or ethnobotanical garden.  Important to Native Americans who used the stems for cordage, rope, twine nets etc. Sun to light shade with some moisture. Will tolerate dry conditions after blooming. Very attractive to butterflies. BEWARE! SPREADS VIGOROUSLY!  
Aquilegia chrysantha  golden columbine
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Aquilegia chrysantha

(golden columbine)

Native to canyons and moist places in the southwest United States, this free flowering columbine sports large, bright yellow, long spurred blossoms. The nodding flower buds turn upright when fully open, rising 1 - 3 ft above the ferny bright green foliage, attracting hummingbirds and hawk moths. Best with light shade and well drained soil and regular to moderate watering. Will accept more sun and dryness once established when compared with other columbines. When happy, this Rocky Mountain beauty is hardy and long lived. 
Aquilegia eximia  serpentine columbine
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Aquilegia eximia

(serpentine columbine)

Large, orangey-red flowers with yellow spurs adorn this beautiful and uncommon native columbine. The pendant, brightly colored blossoms are larger than those of the western columbine but just as attractive to hummingbirds. Forms a 1 ft. high mound of foliage with flowering stalks reaching up to 4 ft. tall. Native to the Coast Ranges from Mendocino to Ventura Counties often on serpentine soils. Provide full sun to part shade and only water enough to prevent the soil from drying out completely. In areas far away from the coast provide a little shade from the hot afternoon sun.
Aquilegia formosa  western columbine
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Aquilegia formosa

(western columbine)

Popular native perennial with fern-like foliage and wonderful nodding spurred blossoms of orangey-red and yellow. Best with a little shade and regular moisture but will tolerate full sun in somewhat cooler climates. Grows 1 1/2’ to 3’ tall. Flowers attract hummingbirds; the seeds are relished by small birds such as sparrows and Juncos.
Arabis blepharophylla  rose rock cress
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Arabis blepharophylla

(rose rock cress)

A charming spring blooming perennial, native to rocky places of coastal scrub, Santa Cruz to Sonoma counties. The neat foliage grows in tight low rosettes and are topped with vibrant rose-purple mustard-like flowers 8 to 10 inches tall. A natural for coastal areas, it requires some relief from the hot sun and additional water inland. Perfect with other non rampant plants of similar requirements on a slope, rock garden, or along a border. Excellent container plant. Good nectar source for butterflies.
Aralia californica  elk clover, spikenard
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Aralia californica

(elk clover, spikenard)

Striking native perennial for shady areas with regular water. Tropical looking foliage 4 - 8 ft. tall with flower stalks of white ball-like clusters followed by purple berries. In the autumn the foliage turns yellow and dies to the ground, returning with exuberance in the spring. Birds relish the fruits. Deer resistant.
Arbutus  'Marina'
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Arbutus 'Marina'

Beautiful evergreen with many of the virtues of our native madrone, but much easier to grow. A hybrid of uncertain parentage growing 25 - 40 ft. tall with dark green leathery leaves that have a red blush to the new growth. Flowers in the autumn with showy clusters of rosy-pink urn-shaped flowers. The round red fruits, about one inch across are sparsely produced. Gorgeous peeling cinnamon red bark is another attractive feature. Can be trained as a single trunked tree, multi-trunked specimen, or grown as a screen or tall hedge. Best in full sun with good drainage where it will accept regular water. It is drought tolerant ONCE ESTABLISHED, but is best with occasional (1x or 2x monthly) deep summer waterings. Will tolerate heavy soils if NOT over watered. Flowers are attractive to hummingbirds.

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Arbutus andrachne

(Greek strawberry tree)

Arbutus andrachne, commonly called the Greek Strawberry Tree, is an evergreen shrub or small tree native to the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and southwestern Asia. Very much like our local native madrone, it develops a smooth red bark with a delicate white "bloom" to it, its white flowers become red fruits. Very drought tolerant once established and tolerant of a range of soils, including serpentine. Good drainage, full sun to partial shade.
Arbutus menziesii  madrone
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Arbutus menziesii

(madrone)

Beautiful native evergreen tree but tricky to establish. Main feature is the handsome smooth reddish bark that peels in thin flakes. Leaves are leathery and shiny dark green. Large clusters of white flowers give way to red-orange berries that can remain into winter if the birds don't get them. MUST have good drainage and just enough water to establish. Once established give only infrequent deep waterings or no water at all.
Arbutus  unedo 'Compacta' compact strawberry tree
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Arbutus unedo 'Compacta'

(compact strawberry tree)

Handsome evergreen shrub or tree with year-round interest. Shiny green foliage with red stems and cinnamon colored bark, grows in a dense rounded form. Abundant flowers and fruits are often present at the same time. Clusters of urn-shaped white flowers bloom in the autumn and are adored by hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. Showy and prolific, knobby, one inch fruits, change from orange to red as they ripen. The edible fruits resemble strawberries in their color and size, but their flavor and texture appeal to birds more than humans. Grows 6 – 10 foot tall and wide, in full sun to light shade and is drought tolerant once established. Responds to pruning to accentuate its’ sculptural qualities or to train into a tree form.  

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Arbutus unedo 'Oktoberfest'

A handsome and useful evergreen shrub native to the Mediterranean, 'Oktoberfest' is a compact cultivar offering many attributes. Growing 6 - 8 ft. tall and wide with dark green leathery foliage and red bark.  An abundance of rose-pink, urn shaped, flowers in the autumn are favored by hummingbird, bees and butterflies. Showy, prolific fruits follow, starting out yellow and turning red as they ripen. A feast for the eyes and wildlife, this drought tolerant shrub is adaptable and long lived. Plant in full sun to light shade where it will be drought tolerant once established. An excellent natural screen or can be pruned into a multi-trunk tree.
Arctostaphylos  'Emerald Carpet' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'Emerald Carpet'

(manzanita)

This popular manzanita forms a wonderful, dense, green groundcover around 1 ft. tall by 6 ft. wide. Clusters of small, white, urn-shaped flowers decorate the plant in early winter. A natural hybrid discovered on Haven's Neck on the southern Mendocino Coast. Often planted en mass to create a large scale groundcover. Somewhat slower growing than bearberry and slightly taller over time. Enjoys full sun near the coast but does best in hotter areas with some afternoon shade. Needs moderate water once established.
Arctostaphylos  'Howard McMinn' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'Howard McMinn'

(manzanita)

One of the most popular of the manzanitas, for several good reasons. It is rounded in form and profusely branched, growing 3 - 6 ft. tall. It has shiny green leaves and abundant light pink flowers. Beautiful mahogany trunks create a wonderful sculptural effect. The dense foliage responds exceptionally well to pruning - even shearing, and tolerates a far greater range of soils and watering regimes than most manzanitas.
Arctostaphylos  'John Dourley' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'John Dourley'

(manzanita)

A beautiful mounding manzanita growing 3-4 ft. tall and 6 ft. wide.Bluish-green leaves with gorgeous bronzy new growth, abundant pink flowers followed by red fruits make this vigorous grower a wonderful addition to the garden. Plant in sunny areas with little to no water once established. The early blooming manzanitas provide an important nectar source for hummingbirds and bees.
Arctostaphylos  'Lester Rowntree' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'Lester Rowntree'

(manzanita)

Introduced by Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and named for early native plant pioneer Lester Rowntree who provided the seed. This hybrid, involving A. pajaroensis, develops into a beautiful specimen, growing 8-10 ft. tall and wide with time. Shapely, upright branches sport bluish foliage with coral-pink, urn-shaped flowers very early, often beginning in October. An unusual feature for an upright manzanita is the large, glossy, red berrieswhich ripen in the summer.  The reddish bark, gorgeous foliage and flowers make this an excellent candidate for sunny areas with little to no summer water once established. Its early flowering period offers nectar to hummingbirds and bees when not much else native is blooming.
Arctostaphylos  'Lutsko's Pink' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'Lutsko's Pink'

(manzanita)

One of the very best ornamental manzanitas, named by Cal Flora for the landscape architect who introduced it: Ron Lutsko. An upright shrub 4 -7 ft. tall, with dark glossy green leaves and covered with blossoms in spring which are blushed pink. Mahogany trunks develop a beautiful contorted shape. Good for dry sunny spot.
Arctostaphylos  'Pacific Mist' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'Pacific Mist'

(manzanita)

A broadly spreading shrub, fast growing for a manzanita, eventually forming a good dense ground cover 2 - 2 1/2 ft. tall by 10 ft. wide. Handsome gray-green leaves with deep reddish-brown bark. Small clusters of white urn-shaped flowers in late winter are pretty, but it is not a heavy bloomer. This fine introduction from Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden is proving to be dependable and disease resistant. Plant in sun or light shade. More drought tolerant than the popular bearberries. In cool summer areas may need no additional summer water once established. In hotter inland sites,occasional deep summer waterings is best. It is believed to be a cross involving the rare Bonny Doon manzanita.
Arctostaphylos  'Sentinel' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'Sentinel'

(manzanita)

Somewhat more upright in habit but less dense and less uniform than Arctostaphylos 'Howard McMinn', it is a far heavier bloomer with LOTS of vivid pink blossoms and soft grey green leaves. A relatively easy and dependable manzanita, growing 6 - 8 ft. tall and wide, though reputed to be less tolerant of irrigation and heavy soils than A. ‘Howard McMinn’, the most adaptable of all manzanitas.  Distinctive burgundy-colored bark. Early nectar source for hummingbirds and bumble bees.
Arctostaphylos  'Sunset' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'Sunset'

(manzanita)

A handsome manzanita growing 6 ft. tall and wide with especially attractive coppery-red new growth. Flowers are urn-shaped pinkish-white. Exfoliating shaggy bark reveals smooth red toned trunks. Can be pruned to expose the beautiful sinuous branching structure. A naturally occuring hybrid discovered near Prunedale in Monterey Co. involving A. pajaroensis and A. hookeri. Tolerant of heavy soils and heat as well as occasional irrigation. 
Arctostaphylos  'White Lanterns' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos 'White Lanterns'

(manzanita)

This lovely manzanita believed to be a selection of A. densiflora originated at the Santa Barbara Botanical Gardens many years ago, but today it is a rare find in nurseries. Slowly growing to a dense mound 3-4 feet tall and wide, this tough and disease resistant plant is equally at home as a beautiful specimen or massed in large plantings. Especially heavy blooming, this shrub is covered with clusters of white blossoms opening from pink buds over a long period in late winter. Excellent early nectar source for hummingbirds and bees. Plant in full sun to very light shade with little to no water once established.    
Arctostaphylos auriculata  Mount Diablo manzanita
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Arctostaphylos auriculata

(Mount Diablo manzanita)

From the rocky slopes of Mount Diablo comes this rare and delightful manzanita. Smallish, fuzzy, grey leaves densely cover the branches over mahogany-red trunks. Late winter brings flowers ranging in color from pink to white.  This species grows slowly and densely to about 5 or 6 ft. tall and at least as wide. Needs full sun. Make sure to provide excellent drainage and little to no irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos bakeri 'Louis Edmunds' Baker's manzanita
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Arctostaphylos bakeri 'Louis Edmunds'

(Baker's manzanita)

A beautiful and durable upright manzanita reaching 5 - 6 ft. tall and wide. This species is native to Sonoma Co. where it is considered very rare and threatened by development. Handsome gray-green foliage with wonderful purplish-brown trunks contrast nicely with showy clusters of pink urn-shaped flowers in spring. Great for sunny areas where it endures heat and drought but enjoys an occasional deep watering. The manzanita berries can attract mockingbirds, robins, and cedar waxwings. It provides low shrubby cover for quail and wren-tits and its flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds.
Arctostaphylos canescens  hoary manzanita
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Arctostaphylos canescens

(hoary manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos columbiana  hairy manzanita
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Arctostaphylos columbiana

(hairy manzanita)

From Northern California’s coastline and outer Coast Ranges comes one of the largest of all manzanitas. This stately large shrub can reach well over 15 ft. tall, often developing a contorted shape with age. The large, gray-green leaves contrast well with the burnished, rust-red trunks.  Clusters of white flowers emerge in spring followed by matte-red fruits. This is THE upright manzanita for coastal areas with good drainage. Provide full sun and no irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos cruzensis  Arroyo de la Cruz manzanita
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Arctostaphylos cruzensis

(Arroyo de la Cruz manzanita)

This rare, ground-hugging manzanita comes from the San Luis Obispo coast. Features grey-green, wedge-shaped leaves and soft pink flowers in the winter. Its distinctive creeping habit makes it ideal for crawling over walls or lining walkways. Provide full sun to light shade and moderate to infrequent irrigation once established. Good in containers.
Arctostaphylos densiflora   Vine Hill manzanita
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Arctostaphylos densiflora

(Vine Hill manzanita)

One of California's rarest natives, this is the pure, true species. Exists only in a very small preserve in western Sonoma Co.. Distinctive for the profusion of beautiful pink to white urn-shaped blossoms they produce in winter and small, shiny bright green leaves. Variable in height but typically grows 3 ft. tall by 6 ft. wide. Does best in its native Sebastopol sandy soils with full sun to light shade and occasional to no summer irrigation.
Arctostaphylos densiflora 'James West' Vine Hill manzanita
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Arctostaphylos densiflora 'James West'

(Vine Hill manzanita)

This wonderful, drought tolerant, low growing manzanita from Sonoma County appears in form and other details to be a selection of the pure species of the very rare Vine Hill Manzanita. It is a very choice cultivar, seldom available in the trade. Grows 18 - 24 inches by 6 ft. in ten years and flowers from January through March with thick heads of shell pink flowers. Good drainage, as with all manzanitas and occasional to no irrigation once established. Full sun.
Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Bert Johnson' Little Sur manzanita
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Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Bert Johnson'

(Little Sur manzanita)

Choice, low growing manzanita introduced by the Tilden Botanic Garden.  Dense, mounding or cascading habit growing to around a foot tall by 6 ft. wide with small dark green leaves and bronzy new growth.  Not as fast growing as 'Carmel Sur'. Clusters of tiny pink to white urn-shaped flowers in winter attract hummingbirds and are followed by handsome cinnamon colored little apple-shaped fruits. Excellent cascading over walls, rocks, or containers in sun to light shade.  This manzanita has proven adaptable and fairly garden tolerant putting up with heavy soils and more summer water than many.  Full sun along the coast with light shade in hot inland sites.  Drought tolerant once established but appreciates occasional summer water.  
Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Big Sur' Little Sur manzanita
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Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Big Sur'

(Little Sur manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Carmel Sur' Little Sur manzanita
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Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Carmel Sur'

(Little Sur manzanita)

Perhaps the fastest growing variety of this species. Attractive gray-green foliage with a dense, spreading habit under 1 ft. tall and 6 ft. across. Light pink flowers appear in winter but are few and infrequent. A handsome alternative to other groundcover manzanitas.  More drought and heat tolerant than the bearberries and 'Emerald Carpet'. Likes full sun but may enjoy a little afternoon shade in especially hot inland sites. 
Arctostaphylos franciscana  Franciscan manzanita
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Arctostaphylos franciscana

(Franciscan manzanita)

This distinctive clone of the very rare franciscan manzanita displays luxuriant growth of shiny, dark green leaves spreading fairly quickly to form a dense drift up to eight ft wide and 2 ft tall. An excellent groundcover similar in appearance to A. uva-ursi but more drought tolerant and somewhat taller. A good manzanita for serpentine but still does well in other soils. Produces a modest display of pinkish white flowers in winter. Plant in full sun but light shade is fine especially in hotter climates. Requires moderate to occasional irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos gabilanensis  Gabilan Mountains manzanita
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Arctostaphylos gabilanensis

(Gabilan Mountains manzanita)

This extremely rare and threatened species wasn’t discovered until the early part of the 21st century, making it the newest species of manzanita to be identified. Not only is it very rare, but it is also extremely beautiful, featuring large, wedge-shaped, fuzzy, grey leaves and new growth flushed rosy-pink. Smooth, burgundy bark clothes the contoured branches which support clusters of whitish flowers in mid-winter, followed by red fruits in the summer. This slow growing shrub will eventually reach a height of 6 ft. or more with a broader width. Provide full sun. Needs decent drainage and will be very drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos glandulosa  Eastwood manzanita
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Arctostaphylos glandulosa

(Eastwood manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos glandulosa f. repens 'Mount Vision' Eastwood manzanita
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Arctostaphylos glandulosa f. repens 'Mount Vision'

(Eastwood manzanita)

Found only in the Bishop pine forest of the Point Reyes Peninsula, the form repens has a low and mounding habit. This particular selection was picked for its exceptionally compact and creeping nature and large, gray-green leaves. Clusters of white flowers hang from branch tips in early winter. While slower growing than most other groundcover manzanitas, this cultivar will eventually reach about 6 ft wide with a height of about 1 ft. 'Mount Vision' is best planted as a specimen rather than in mass plantings. Very drought tolerant once established with full sun to light shade. An excellent container plant.
Arctostaphylos glauca  bigberry manzanita
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Arctostaphylos glauca

(bigberry manzanita)

Description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos hookeri 'Monterey Carpet' Monterey manzanita
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Arctostaphylos hookeri 'Monterey Carpet'

(Monterey manzanita)

Evergreen, creeping manzanita less than 1 ft. tall with small, deep green leaves. Dark red branches tend to root and increase its spread to 8 ft. or so wide. Small clusters of white flowers appear in late winter to early spring. Prefers a little shade inland. Drought tolerant but enjoys occasional irrigation in inland sites. Perfect under deciduous oaks or tall pines. Works well in spots where the creeping branches can spill over an edge, creating a cascade effect. 
Arctostaphylos hookeri 'Wayside' Monterey manzanita
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Arctostaphylos hookeri 'Wayside'

(Monterey manzanita)

A robust selection of the Monterey manzanita with dense branches growing to 3 ft. high by 8 ft or more broad. Attractive upsweeping crooked trunks with little white flowers and small deep green leaves. Occurring on open hills around Monterey Bay. Despite its somewhat coastal origin, this selection tolerates, sun, heat and drought quite well. That being said, it will also accept occasional irrigation and light shade. A very useful plant for covering large sunny banks with poor soil.
Arctostaphylos hookeri spp. hearstiorum  Hearst's manzanita
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Arctostaphylos hookeri spp. hearstiorum

(Hearst's manzanita)

Description coming soon!

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Arctostaphylos hookeri x pajaroensis - Tilden form

(manzanita)

We thank Tilden Botanic Garden for this natural cross from the Pajaro River area of Monterey Bay. While similar to ‘Sunset’, this selection has somewhat denser foliage and thicker, more rigid stems. A vigorous and disease resistant manzanita with dark green, wedge-shaped leaves and bronzy-red new growth. In late winter, small, whitish flowers draw native bees into the garden for nectar. The slightly shaggy, cinnamon-colored bark covers the contorted trunks to great effect. Reaches up to a height of about 5 or 6 ft. and a width of around 7 ft. Provide full sun to part shade. Is more tolerant of heavy soils than many manzanitas and will accept moderate to infrequent irrigation in the garden.
Arctostaphylos manzanita  common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita

(common manzanita)

Good subject for a dry sunny bank where this picturesque native shrub can develop its beautiful form of sinewy branches and smooth red-brown bark. Growing 8-12 ft. tall by 6-10 ft. wide or even larger with time. Flowers heavily in the spring with white to soft pink urn-shaped flowers followed by clusters of tiny apple-shaped fruits. An excellent habitat plant providing food and cover for a wide array of birds. The flowers are an excellent early nectar source for bees and hummingbirds. Very drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Austin Griffiths' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Austin Griffiths'

(manzanita)

Believed to be a cross between 'Sentinel' and 'Dr. Hurd', this hybrid was discovered by Native Sons Nursery and named in honor of a valued volunteer. Glossy green leaves and dark maroon-brown bark form an attractive backdrop for large clusters of soft pink flowers.  The blooms appear in early winter, providing a valuable nectar source for hummingbirds and bees. Over time, this upright manzanita can reach a height of up to 10 feet and a width of 6 ft. More garden tolerant than 'Dr. Hurd', 'Austin Griffiths' accepts occasional irrigation but can be drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Bates' Yellow' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Bates' Yellow'

(common manzanita)

Plant description coming soon!
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Dr. Hurd' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Dr. Hurd'

(common manzanita)

This selection of the common manzanita features large, rounded leaves of a distinctive pale green coloration. Becomes a large shrub or small tree, reaching up to 15 ft. tall with a beautiful mahogany-red trunk and a broad, round form.  Showy large clusters of white urn-shaped flowers in January, followed by burnished red berries. Prefers full sun, decent drainage and no irrigation once established. 

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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Frei Road'

(common manzanita)

Large clusters of soft pink flowers and a contoured, open shape distinguish this West Sonoma County manzanita from its kin. Smooth, burgundy bark clothes the meandering branches offsetting the green, pointed leaves. Reaches a height of 8 ft. or more and a width of at least 6ft. May be pruned to create a more upright habit. This selection is more tolerant of irrigation and heavier soils than many inland manzanitas and is also more disease resistant. Provide full sun and occasional to no irrigation once established.

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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Garrison Canyon'

(common manzanita)

This large, tree-like selection comes from Garrison Canyon on Pepperwood Preserve above Mark West Springs. Big, round, pewter-green leaves adorn branches covered in smooth mahogany bark. Especially large clusters of soft-pink flowers emerge in late winter and are followed in summer by “little apple” fruits. In time, this selection may reach up to 15 ft. tall and wide. Provide full sun. Very drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Hood Mountain' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Hood Mountain'

(common manzanita)

A Nevin Smith introduction from Hood Mountain in Sonoma County, California.  A possible natural hybrid with A. canescens, this sturdy upright manzanita offers grayish-green leaves on sculpted dark purplish-grey branches, growing 8-10 ft. tall and wide at maturity. White, urn-shaped flowers in late winter/early spring are a favorite of hummingbirds and bees. The large upright manzanitas make stunning specimens and, where space allows, excellent hedge or screen plants. Plant in full sun where it will thrive with no summer irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Laguna White' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Laguna White'

(common manzanita)

Discovered along Guerneville Road near the Laguna de Santa Rosa, this remarkable manzanita boasts dense clusters of clear white flowers in winter with semi-glossy apple green leaves and burgundy colored bark. Plant in full sun where it will reach a height of about 8 ft. tall by 6 ft. wide or more over time. More garden tolerant than many manzanitas, this selection will accept occasional watering after establishment. Though drought tolerant, 'Laguna White' may benefit from deep monthly waterings in the summer, especially in hot interior sites. An excellent early source of nectar for hummingbirds and native bees.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Mary's Blush' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Mary's Blush'

(common manzanita)

Selected along Guerneville Rd. in Sonoma County. It has the form and size of the common manzanita, 6 feet or more, with the disease resistance of the Vine Hill manzanita hybrids. Around a foot of growth a year is reasonable to expect initially. It has a beautiful deep mahogany trunk & is heavy flowering with clusters of pink flowers followed by beautiful red berries. Give it sun, good drainage and summer drought, but it's more tolerant than most of less than ideal conditions. The manzanita berries can attract mockingbirds, robins, and Cedar Waxwings. If unpruned it can provide cover for quail and wren-tits and its flowers provide nectar for native bees & hummingbirds.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Monica' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Monica'

(common manzanita)

Found originally along Guerneville Rd. in Sonoma County. It has the form and size of the large common manzanita, 10 ft or more with time, and the disease resistance of the Vine Hill manzanita. Features a beautiful dark mahogany trunk and clusters of shell pink flowers set against dark, glossy leaves. More upright in form than most other tall manzanitas. Give it sun to light shade and summer drought, but it's more tolerant than most of some summer water.Provides food and cover for birds and its flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds and bumble bees.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Sebastopol White'  common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Sebastopol White'

(common manzanita)

This upright manzanita displays dense growth of soft green, pointed leaves with clusters of white flowers in winter on a burnished mahogany trunk. Reaches a height of 8 ft or more and a width of at least 6 ft. Discovered along Guerneville Rd. in western Sonoma County. Very drought tolerant once established but will tolerate moderate irrigation when young. A disease resistant selection. Heavy soils are not a problem as long as water does not pool at the crown in winter. Enjoys full sun but will tolerate light shade.
Arctostaphylos montana ssp. montana  Mount Tamalpais manzanita
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Arctostaphylos montana ssp. montana

(Mount Tamalpais manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos montana ssp. ravenii  Presidio manzanita
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Arctostaphylos montana ssp. ravenii

(Presidio manzanita)

This diminutive, groundcover manzanita once grew on windswept, serpentine outcrops in San Francisco where the Presidio currently exists. Due to rapid development in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, only one clone of this manzanita currently exists in the wild, making it one of the rarest species around. The small, thick, gray-green leaves line creeping stems reaching 6 - 12 inches in height. Forms a large mat over time, crawling around rocks and other obstacles. In late winter/early spring, clusters of little, white, urn-shaped flowers appear at the ends of the stems. Needs full sun to light shade and decent drainage. Drought tolerant once established but will enjoy an occasional deep watering, especially in warmer areas. You don’t have to be a collector to enjoy this appealing little manzanita.
Arctostaphylos montereyensis  Monterey manzanita
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Arctostaphylos montereyensis

(Monterey manzanita)

Beautiful pink flowers in winter and bright green leaves make this very rare manzanita from the Monterey Bay a must-have for the discerning collector. Slowly mounds to 5 or 6 ft. tall and round with a classic reddish trunk. Provide full sun to very light shade and occasional to no irrigation once established. So far we have found it to be surprisingly adaptable, tolerating some irrigation as it ages. Decent drainage will probably be needed. 
Arctostaphylos nummularia 'Bear Belly' glossy-leaf manzanita
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Arctostaphylos nummularia 'Bear Belly'

(glossy-leaf manzanita)

A remarkably compact selection of this shiny-leaved manzanita discovered by Ken Taylor at Haven’s Neck on the southern Mendocino coast. Little bell-like flowers of pink-tinged white emerge in late winter set against small, round leaves growing regularly along the stems. The slightly shaggy bark is a reddish-brown color and contrasts nicely with the dark green foliage. Over a few years,this plant reaches a height of about 1 foot and a width of about 3 feet. Unlike most manzanitas, this species needs moderate water and protection from the hot afternoon sun in inland locales. Makes a great container plant.

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Arctostaphylos osoensis

(Oso manzanita)

A beautiful and extremely rare manzanita from a small area above Morro Bay. The bright green leaves are auriculate, meaning “ear-shaped”, and have a distinctive matte finish, with new growth emerging in a reddish bronze color. Small clusters of dainty, pinkish-white flowers emerge in late winter/early spring and are adored by hummingbirds. The contorted branches are smooth and colored reddish-brown, aging to gray. Oso manzanita is attractively rounded and dense when young, only reaching to about 5 ft. or so in height with a slightly larger width. With age, it will begin to open, revealing its striking, sculptural trunks. Needs full sun and enjoys occasional irrigation, though it is quite drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos pajaroensis 'Paradise' Pajaro manzanita
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Arctostaphylos pajaroensis 'Paradise'

(Pajaro manzanita)

This rare species offers striking foliage and flowers. Large flower clusters of a lovely shade of pink and are followed by prominent rusty-red berries, enjoyed by birds. Beautiful bronze new growth ages to an appealing blue-green which contrasts nicely with the shaggy cinnamon-colored bark. Approximately 6 ft. or more tall and 8 - 10 ft. across in 10 years. Full sun to light shade, excellent drainage with little to no water once established. Flowers are an excellent early source of nectar for hummingbirds and bumble bees.
Arctostaphylos pajaroensis 'Warren Roberts' Pajaro manzanita
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Arctostaphylos pajaroensis 'Warren Roberts'

(Pajaro manzanita)

This stunning manzanita displays coral-pink flowers in early winter set against chalky blue-green leaves. In the spring the burnished red new growth emerges creating a striking contrast with the older leaves. The widely curving branches covered with shaggy cinnamon colored bark create a wonderfully sculpted look. If left unpruned, this selection will form a broad drift, about 6ft. high and up to 8ft. wide. 'Warren Roberts' is denser and has more intense blue-green leaves than its sister, 'Paradise'. Provide full sun to very light shade and occasional to no irrigation once established. Needs decent drainage.

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Arctostaphylos pumila 'Wavelength'

(sandmat manzanita)

A rare species endemic to areas on and around the Monterey Peninsula. ‘Wavelength’, a Dave Fross selection, is a dense, mounding, low shrub reaching 2 – 3 ft. tall and +10 ft. across. Soft, gray-green foliage and bronzy new growth accentuate its undulating form. White, lantern-shaped flowers appear in spring, enjoyed by hummingbirds. Great for sloped, drainy sites where it can take up a lot of real estate. Can take full sun to light shade. Low irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos sensitiva  glossyleaf manzanita
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Arctostaphylos sensitiva

(glossyleaf manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos silvicola  ghostly manzanita
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Arctostaphylos silvicola

(ghostly manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos silvicola 'Ghostly' Bonny Doon manzanita
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Arctostaphylos silvicola 'Ghostly'

(Bonny Doon manzanita)

Description coming soon!

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Arctostaphylos stanfordiana

(Stanford manzanita)

One of the most beautiful of manzanitas with handsome dark mahogany bark, dense shiny green leaves and flowers ranging in color from intense pink to white. Its upright form ranges in height from 4 to 8 ft with a somewhat narrower width. Native to warmer areas of northern California's Coast Range, this species requires excellent drainage, full sun and NO water once established.

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Arctostaphylos stanfordiana 'Sonoma'

(Stanford manzanita)

Masses of deep pink flowers and glossy, deep green leaves are an enticing feature of this uncommon selection.  But what really distinguishes this cultivar from other Stanford manzanitas is the fact that it actually survives in the garden! Most other selections of this species are notoriously challenging to keep alive in cultivation. While fairly slow growing, the dense foliage mounds up over time to reach a height and width of about 5 ft. The striking burgundy-red trunks contrast nicely with the green leaves. Needs full sun and excellent drainage. No summer water once established.

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Arctostaphylos stanfordiana ssp. decumbens

(Rincon manzanita)

A Sonoma County endemic, this rare manzanita is from Rincon Ridge east of Santa Rosa. Low growing mounding shrub to as much as 3 ft tall by 4 ft. wide. Charming pink urn-shaped flowers in early spring. Handsome, rugged and drought tolerant. Best in full sun with good drainage, no water necessary once established. A good choice for lean soils, summer heat and drought.
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Green Supreme' bearberry
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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Green Supreme'

(bearberry)

A superior garden hybrid of the trailing bearberry. A volunteer seedling discovered by staff at Tilden Regional Parks Botanic Garden. Ultimately spreads 4 - 12 ft. across and no more than 6 inches tall. Enjoys moderate to occasional irrigation.  The glossy bright green leaves create a beautiful groundcover. Tolerates a wide range of soil types with reasonable drainage. Very disease resistant and fast growing. Shy to bloom or set berries. Sun to part-shade.
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Point Reyes' Point Reyes bearberry
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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Point Reyes'

(Point Reyes bearberry)

  An unusual selection of our native bearberry discovered near the Point Reyes lighthouse in Marin County.  Dark green, leathery leaves form distinctive whorls along the stems with pale pink, urn-shaped flowers emerging in early winter. The showy red berries  contrast nicely with the dark green leaves.  Reaching a height of about l8” and a width approaching 6 ft., this groundcover works well in a rock garden or mixed with other low shrubs and grasses from our coastal areas.  Give moderate water in interior locations and protect from the hot afternoon sun.  
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Radiant' bearberry
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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Radiant'

(bearberry)

A very low mat of glossy, dark green foliage 6 - 8 inches high and creeping 4 - 6 ft. across. Light pink flowers in early winter are followed by showy red berries. In hot inland areas give moderate water and light afternoon shade. A sturdy evergreen groundcover.

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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Samoa Dunes'

(bearberry)

This Humboldt County selection of the ubiquitous bearberry distinguishes itself with large, rounded, glossy leaves of deep green. Reaching a height of about 6 inches and a width of at least 6 feet, this durable groundcover spreads quickly to form a weed-smothering carpet. Little urn-shaped flowers colored soft pink appear in spring and are followed by shiny red berries. Provide full sun to part shade and moderate to occasional irrigation once established. Protect from the hot afternoon sun in warmer areas. The shiny, dark green foliage combines well with grey-leaved plants such as Artemisia ‘David’s Choice’ and the fescue ‘Patrick’s Point’. 

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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'San Bruno Mountain'

(bearberry)

A beautiful selection of bearberry from San Bruno Mountain south of San Francisco. This groundcover manzanita forms a luxuriant mat of large, glossy, spatulate leaves spreading to around 6 feet wide. The soft pink urn-shaped flowers lead to big red showy berries.  A natural for coastal plantings where it can grow in full sun with little to no summer water needed. Inland, bearberry does best with shade from the hot afternoon sun and moderate summer watering.
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Wood's Compact' bearberry
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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Wood's Compact'

(bearberry)

A low growing, spreading manzanita with lustrous green, rounded foliage, little pink urn-shaped flowers and pretty red berries, quite large for the species. This selection from coastal Oregon spreads at a moderate pace to 6-8 feet wide and only getting 6-8 inches tall. Full sun to light shade in hot areas with moderate summer water.
Arctostaphylos virgata  Marin manzanita
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Arctostaphylos virgata

(Marin manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos viscida  whiteleaf manzanita
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Arctostaphylos viscida

(whiteleaf manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos x media 'Bokeya Pomo' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos x media 'Bokeya Pomo'

(manzanita)

From the rugged Mendocino coast comes this distinctive manzanita groundcover. Similar to the selection ‘Peter Ehrlich’ with its large, rounded, grey-green leaves but with a slightly more upright, sculptural form which is not quite as dense. Even though it will reach a width of at least 6 ft. over time and height of 2ft., it may take several years to do so.  Urn-shaped white flowers appear in the winter and are followed by round, green fruits in the spring.  Provide full sun to light shade and moderate to occasional irrigation once established.  Should be fairly drought tolerant once established.

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Arctostaphylos x media 'Humboldt Mystery'

(manzanita)

Arching branches and a mounding habit up to 5 ft. tall and 6 ft. wide distinguish this manzanita from its relatives. In winter, pinkish-white flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds and bees, followed by large, red berries in the autumn. Burnished red trunks display a colorful backdrop to the leathery, large, dark green leaves. Plant in full sun to light shade and provide moderate to infrequent irrigation. James Roof of Tilden Botanic Garden discovered this unusual selection somewhere on the Humboldt Coast, but, true to his enigmatic character, refused to say where he found it. It is believed to be a natural cross between bearberry and the hairy manzanita.
Arctostaphylos x media 'Peter Ehrlich' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos x media 'Peter Ehrlich'

(manzanita)

This unusual manzanita from the southern Mendocino coast features what may be the largest leaves of any of the groundcover manzanitas. The round, grey-green foliage mounds densely over time to reach a height of about 3 ft. and a width of up to 8 ft. Clusters of white flowers gather at branch tips in winter, followed by little apple-like fruits in the spring.  While fairly adaptable in the garden, decent drainage is best and full sun to light shade.  Accepting of moderate irrigation but will become quite drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos x media - Point Arena forms  manzanita
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Arctostaphylos x media - Point Arena forms

(manzanita)

This special and diverse group of manzanitas come from Point Arena on the southern Mendocino Coast. These naturally occurring hybrids involve at least two species: A. uva-ursi, A. columbiana and sometimes A. nummularia. The resulting offspring have wonderfully varying features. The leaves range from large, light-green, and fuzzy to small, dark-green and glossy. The plants can form a mounding habit reaching up to 4 feet tall or hug the ground to form dense mats. Plant in full sun to light shade and give moderate to infrequent irrigation once established. Plants grown in hot areas will benefit from extra irrigation and some afternoon shade.

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Arctostaphylos x media - Tilden form

(manzanita)

This big-leaved selection was discovered at Point Arena on the southern Mendocino coast by Steve Edwards of Tilden Botanic Garden. Distinctive for its large, hairy, apple-green leaves and low, dense form only reaching up to about a foot in height and at least 6 ft. in width. Clusters of white flowers appear in spring followed by round, bright green fruits. Plant in full sun to light shade and provide moderate to occasional irrigation once established. Should be quite drought tolerant once established.
Aristolochia californica  Dutchman's pipe vine
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Aristolochia californica

(Dutchman's pipe vine)

Dutchman’s pipe vine is an interesting vine native to river, stream side and woodland habitats. Soft heart-shaped leaves and unusual purplish pipe-shaped flowers bloom in early spring. This deciduous twining plant will need some support if you wish it to grow upwards. Adaptable, but best with a little shade and moderate water. Slow to establish, we offer this adage to encourage patience: “The first year it sleeps, the second year it creeps and the third year it leaps”. Once established it will put on ample growth, easily covering a trellis or chain link fence. THE larval food source for the pipevine swallowtail butterfly. Deer resistant.
Armeria maritima ssp. californica  sea thrift
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Armeria maritima ssp. californica

(sea thrift)

Grown from northern California seed source, this coastal native is a sturdy perennial with grass-like blades in compact clumps. Pink pompom flowers on long stems bloom spring into summer. A natural along the coast where it grows in full sun, needing a little shade in hotter regions. Moderate to little water with decent drainage.  Excellent for rock gardens. Deer resistant.
Artemisia californica  California sagebrush
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Artemisia californica

(California sagebrush)

Native to coastal regions from Northern California to Baja. Densely branched shrub with finely divided gray-green scented foliage. Grows 2 - 4 ft. tall and wide. Light pruning or pinching help keep it dense. Grown for its wonderful texture and foliage color, flowers are inconspicuous. Requires decent drainage and full sun. Thrives in coastal environments, but has performed well inland, especially on slopes where cold air and winter wet drains away. Drought and deer tolerant.
Artemisia californica 'Canyon Gray' prostrate California sagebrush
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Artemisia californica 'Canyon Gray'

(prostrate California sagebrush)

An unusual prostrate form of our coastal native sagebrush, forming a loose, nearly flat mat of finely cut, silvery, fragrant foliage around 4 ft. wide. Useful as a bank cover or for the top of a retaining wall where it can cascade over the edge. Combines beatifully with ceanothus, buckwheats and iris. Should be cut back from time to time to keep dense. Enjoys full sun to light shade and is very drought tolerant once established. Deer resistant.
Artemisia californica 'Montara' California sagebrush
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Artemisia californica 'Montara'

(California sagebrush)

Selected by Roger Raiche at Montara Ridge in San Mateo County. Forms a mound of finely cut fragrant foliage to around 2 ft. tall by 3 ft. (or more) wide. Requires full sun with decent drainage and is drought tolerant once established. Occasional summer water helps retain fresh look. Thrives in coastal environments. Deer resistant.

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Artemisia douglasiana

(mugwort)

Mugwort is native to many plant communities where there is at least some year round moisture: streams and riverbanks, road cuts, ditches, and moist meadows. A stout, rhizomatous perennial with aromatic foliage that is green on top and silvery beneath. The flowers are small and not particularly showy. The foliage is beautiful and fragrant with a long history of medicinal uses. Plant in sun to light shade where it will grow 3 ft. tall and spreading to form a colony. Well watered plants can grow even taller. Provides excellent cover and seeds for birds. Deer resistant.
Artemisia pycnocephala  sandhill sage
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Artemisia pycnocephala

(sandhill sage)

Plant description coming soon.
Artemisia pycnocephala 'David's Choice' sandhill sage
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Artemisia pycnocephala 'David's Choice'

(sandhill sage)

An exceptionally fine selection of a coastal native. Forms a dense silky mound of silvery foliage 4 - 6 inches tall and up to 2 ft. wide. The floppy flowering stems rise a foot above the foliage and are interesting but not real showy. Shear back for longer life. Sun and drought tolerant. Deer resistant.
Artemisia pycnocephala 'Dr. Seuss' sandhill sage
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Artemisia pycnocephala 'Dr. Seuss'

(sandhill sage)

In deference to this selection’s whimsical form, we have named it in honor of the children’s author who truly embodies “whimsical”. Soft, silvery, ferny foliage slowly spreads across the ground on woody branches with unusually tall flower stalks reaching up to 3 feet in height. As the stalks arise, the base is thickly covered in the showy foliage, getting narrower as it approaches the flower buds, giving the plant its unusual form. The small flowers are pale yellow and open in late spring and into summer. Provide good drainage and plant in full sun to light shade. Deer resistant.
Artemisia suksdorfii  coastal mugwort
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Artemisia suksdorfii

(coastal mugwort)

Rhizomatous perennial with sturdy upright stems of whitish-gray felted foliage. Native to coastal California where it grows in seasonal drainages near the ocean. Growing 1 1/2 ft. to 3 ft. tall and spreading to form small colonies of beautiful wooly foliage with a pleasant sage scent. The tiny flowers are not particularly showy but are attractive to pollinators. Useful in informal gardens for sunny areas with some summer moisture. Probably best in areas with some coastal influence. Cut to the ground annually to freshen and make room for new spring growth. Deer resistant.
Aruncus dioicus  goat's beard
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Aruncus dioicus

(goat's beard)

Native to stream sides and moist woods from Mendocino County, California north to Alaska.  A bold and showy perennial looking like a giant astilbe. Forms dense clumps of finely divided foliage with arching, feathery plumes of white flowers 3-5 ft. tall in summer. Requires regular moisture and part shade where it makes a striking specimen or accent plant in the woodland garden. Dies back to its roots in winter. The frothy flower plumes attract an array of tiny little pollinators and the seed heads on female plants are an important food source for birds. Said to be deer resistant.
Asarum caudatum  wild ginger
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Asarum caudatum

(wild ginger)

Native to the deep shade of forest floors, this evergreen perennial forms a handsome low groundcover. Deep green, heart shaped leaves hide the unusual flowers which are maroon with long spidery tails. The ginger scented leaves are deer resistant. For shade with moisture.
Asarum caudatum 'Alba' white-flowered wild ginger
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Asarum caudatum 'Alba'

(white-flowered wild ginger)

An interesting form of the native, shade loving wild ginger. Calling the flowers white is a stretch, they are more of a wasabi-green rather than the usual maroon color of the species. The intriguing long tailed flowers are hidden beneath the glossy heart shaped leaves and would need to be planted on a wall, slope or container to make them easier to view. Wild ginger prefers shade and moisture where it will form a low spreading groundcover.
Asarum marmoratum  marbled wild ginger
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Asarum marmoratum

(marbled wild ginger)

Plant description coming soon.
Asclepias fascicularis  narrowleaf milkweed
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Asclepias fascicularis

(narrowleaf milkweed)

Our most common native milkweed is found in meadows and on the banks above ponds. Its flowers are held in umbels of a pale mauve color. They form at the top of 1 - 3 ft. tall slender stems that die back in winter to a perennial rootstock. Its wandering roots form small colonies. Drought tolerant, it prefers seasonally moist soils and likes moderate water in the garden. The narrow leaves are the preferred larval food for the Monarch Butterfly. Full sun to part shade. Unlikely to be bothered by deer.
Asclepias speciosa  showy milkweed
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Asclepias speciosa

(showy milkweed)

Bold and beautiful native milkweed forms a large patch of tall stems with broad pale green leaves. Fragrant clusters of pinkish-purple flowers followed by interesting seed pods. Spreads by underground shoots. Great in semidry naturalistic plantings. Host to Monarch butterflies. Deer resistant.
Asplenium trichomanes  maidenhair spleenwort
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Asplenium trichomanes

(maidenhair spleenwort)

This small fern is found in rocky habitats almost worldwide, though uncommon in California, where it is found only in Del Norte County.  Tiny, dark green, oval leaves line the black stems of this diminutive evergreen fern. The narrow fronds form short tufts under 8 inches tall that spread slowly.  Easy to grow, this little cutie is perfect for tucking into a shady rock garden, wall or container planting.  Best in gritty, well drained soils with regular to moderate summer irrigation.  Deer resistant.
Aster x frikartii 'Monch' aster
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Aster x frikartii 'Monch'

(aster)

A particularly fine hybrid from the 1920’s, valued for its long display of clear lavender-blue daisies on stout, upright foliage, to around 2 ft. tall and wide. Easy to grow in full sun with good drainage and regular to moderate water. A wide variety of bee species visit this perennial, foraging for nectar and pollen. Attractive to butterflies too. Its long bloom period, May through October, make it a wonderful color accent and a powerhouse in the pollinator garden.
Aster (Eurybia) radulinus 'Gilliam Creek' rough-leaved aster
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Aster (Eurybia) radulinus 'Gilliam Creek'

(rough-leaved aster)

This charming woodland aster makes its home in bright, dryish woods from the Channel Islands all the way up to the Oregon border and into the northern Sierras. Normally a shy, dainty little forest dweller, this selection from Sonoma County is far more robust, featuring large clusters of white-petaled daisies with white centers which turn yellow with age, and finally a deep maroon. Flower stalks reach up to 2 ft. high, much taller than is typical for the species. Serrated, deep green leaves form a high mat on this slowly spreading ground cover. An excellent plant for dry, woodland gardens, but will also tolerate moderate irrigation. One of the few excellent pollinator plants for the lightly shaded garden.
Aster (Symphyotrichum)  'Bill's Big Blue' aster
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) 'Bill's Big Blue'

(aster)

This vigorous aster is from the late Bay Area nurseryman Ed Carman. Sturdy, erect stems 4 ft. or more tall, clothed in narrow deep green leaves. Flowers profusely, late in the season with medium blue daisies. This beauty can really spread, forming broad clumps. Can be invasive. A wonderful late nectar source for bees and butterflies.
Aster (Symphyotrichum)  'Fanny's'
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) 'Fanny's'

One of our last to bloom, this Aster is smothered in one inch blue daisies in Autumn. Grows 3 -4 ft. tall and wide.  Easy and dependable, in full sun with regular to moderate summer water. Awesome pollinator plant attracting all sorts of bees and butterflies.    
Aster (Symphyotrichum)  'Little Carlow' aster
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) 'Little Carlow'

(aster)

Quickly becoming a favorite, this aster grows to about 4 ft. tall. Rich lavender-blue daisies cover this plant in late summer. Best with regular water in full sun. A butterfly favorite - highly attractive to all sorts of pollinators.

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Aster (Symphyotrichum) 'Raydon's Favorite'

(aromatic aster)

A fine late blooming Aster thought to be from eastern Tennessee, with compact aromatic foliage and dazzling bright blue-purple daisies. Forms a dense mound 18 – 24 inches tall and wide, with flowers nearly covering the foliage when in full bloom. Plant in full sun with regular to moderate summer water. Highly attractive to bees and butterflies. Deer resistant.    

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Aster (Symphyotrichum) chilensis

(California aster)

This native aster is found throughout much of Sonoma County, usually in moist soils. Here its form is far more slender or gracile than the burly Point St. George clone. It spreads as widely as the previously mentioned clone but with a lighter touch, integrating itself well with native grasses and bulbs. Its summer to fall blossoms are white to lavender blue and provide excellent nectar for butterflies and beneficial insects. 1-2 ft. tall and spreading. Sun to light shade. Moderate to little summer irrigation.

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Aster (Symphyotrichum) chilensis 'Olema White'

(white California aster)

The classic lavender/purple flowers of the California aster are replaced with clear white in this unusual selection which we found near the town of Olema in Marin County. In summer and into fall, a profusion of flowers bursts forth on this VIGOROUSLY spreading native perennial. An extremely adaptable groundcover reaching up to 2 ft. tall. Accepts regular to very little irrigation and full sun to light shade. This prolific bloomer is a bee magnet and also enjoyed by butterflies. Tolerant of clay and periodic flooding. Looks best when sheared to the ground after blooming.
Aster (Symphyotrichum) chilensis 'Point Saint George' California aster
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) chilensis 'Point Saint George'

(California aster)

A low growing vigorous native perennial, reaching up to 6 inches in height and spreading widely and aggressively. Covered with soft lavender daisies over a long period, summer through fall, often into winter. Careful thought should be given to its placement, this plant really spreads. Far too vigorous for many settings, perhaps best used in large containers or contained areas or in large, naturalistic plantings. For sunny areas with at least a little summer water. Will tolerate flooding and periodic inundation. An excellent nectar source for bees and butterflies and seeds for birds.
Aster (Symphyotrichum) chilensis 'Purple Haze' California aster
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) chilensis 'Purple Haze'

(California aster)

A Santa Barbara Botanic Garden selection of the coast aster which offers a deeper shade of lavender blossoms than normally seen. Blooms late summer through fall and often into winter with 1 inch medium-lavender daisies opening from dark purple buds. Grows 1 - 3 ft. high and SPREADS VIGOROUSLY by rhizomes. Use this to advantage to stabilize soils, as a ground cover or in a large scale meadow planting where it tolerates many soil types in full sun to light shade. Appreciates some summer water though it is drought tolerant. Keeping it dryish will slow its spread. An easy to grow bee and butterfly favorite.   
Aster (Symphyotrichum) divaricatus - Raiche form  wood aster
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) divaricatus - Raiche form

(wood aster)

Native to eastern North American woodlands, this useful perennial will light up a shady area with its profusion of one inch white daisies in late summer. This form, selected by Roger Raiche, has larger flowers than the standard A. divaricatus. They are held on lovely, dark, wiry stems that grow just under 2 ft. tall over spreading mats of foliage to 2 ft. wide.Plant in light shade with moderate to regular summer water. Will tolerate dryish conditions once established. Aster's are attractive to pollinators.
Aster (Symphyotrichum) ericoides 'Monte Cassino' white heath aster
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) ericoides 'Monte Cassino'

(white heath aster)

We got this vigorous aster from a cut flower grower - the sprays of small white daisies make excellent “cuts”. The plant grows 3 - 4 ft. tall and almost as wide, blooms toward the end of summer, profusely. Easy to grow - full sun, regular watering to look its best, but fairly thrifty in heavy soils. The asters are bee and butterfly favorites. 
Aster (Symphyotrichum) lateriflorus 'Lady in Black' aster
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) lateriflorus 'Lady in Black'

(aster)

Here’s a beautiful cultivar of a North American native. Forms colonies of purplish-black foliage 3 ft. or so tall and wide. Late summer and fall brings a profusion of tiny white daisies with pink centers. The nectar rich blossoms are highly attractive to pollinators of all sorts. Full sun and regular water, though fairly thrifty in heavy soils.
Aster (Symphyotrichum) lateriflorus 'Prince' aster
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Aster (Symphyotrichum) lateriflorus 'Prince'

(aster)

Beautiful purple-black foliage and sturdy upright stems 2 - 3 ft. tall. Small white daisies cover the plant in late summer. Similar to Aster ‘Lady in Black’ but it stays in small clumps rather than producing a colony. Sun and regular water.
Astragalus nuttalii var. nuttallii  ocean bluff milkvetch
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Astragalus nuttalii var. nuttallii

(ocean bluff milkvetch)

Plant description coming soon.
Athyrium filix-femina  lady fern
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Athyrium filix-femina

(lady fern)

Native to much of North America, lady fern grows in moist shady places. The newly emerging fiddleheads in the spring are particularly attractive. The graceful, delicate looking fronds grow 4 foot or more tall by 2 - 3 ft. wide. Lovely in a forest setting, as a background plant, or around a pond. Goes dormant in the winter. Plant in full to part shade with regular water.
Athyrium filix-femina 'Minutissimum' dwarf lady fern
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Athyrium filix-femina 'Minutissimum'

(dwarf lady fern)

A miniature form of the lovely lady fern, growing up to one foot tall and two feet wide. Forms compact mounds of finely divided light green fronds. Perfect for the small spaces, rock gardens or containers. A vigorous and hardy fern needing only shade and moisture to thrive. Dies back to the ground in the winter. The new unfurling fiddleheads adds charm in the spring. Deer resistant.  

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Atriplex lentiformis 'Naomi'

(quail bush)

Quail bush is a large evergreen shrub with attractive silver-gray foliage, native to salt flats, desert scrub and coastal areas of California, the Southwest US, and Northern Mexico. A tough shrub tolerant of poor, saline, or alkaline soils, often used in restoration or large plantings that can accommodate its size and spread. Excellent in dry gardens, hedgerow plantings and for erosion control where it grows quickly and is extremely drought tolerant once established. Growing 5 - 7 foot tall and wide, it can be clipped to keep dense and in bounds. 'Naomi' is a female selection of this dioecious shrub, selected for its allergy resistance due to the lack of pollen. Plant in full sun to light shade with moderate to little or no summer water once established. 
Atriplex lentiformis ssp. breweri  quail bush
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Atriplex lentiformis ssp. breweri

(quail bush)

This subspecies is the coastal form of quail bush, a tough and useful shrub with beautiful silvery gray foliage. Growing 4 ft. or more tall and spreading widely, quail bush is valued for its ability to deal with difficult sites where it tolerates wind, salt spray, saline and alkaline soils. A terrific habitat plant providing food and cover for a wide array of birds and mammals. Excellent for erosion control and is fire resistant. Benefits from annual shearing and occasional aggressive pruning to rejuvenate. Plant in full sun with occasional to little summer water.
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