Our Plants

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Z

More information »

Echeveria cultivars

Attractive evergreen clumping succulents, forming rosettes of waxy leaves with graceful flowers of yellow, orange, pink or rose on arching stems in late spring/summer. Not commonly found in true hot desert conditions, many echeverias originated in high, cold, plateaus of Mexico, the Peruvian Andes, tropical areas of South America, and a few in Texas. They are drought tolerant, but appreciate water while actively growing in summer, provided they dry out in between. Well drained soil is very important. Many are situated on mountains and rocky cliffs, giving them resistance to cold, and allowing any water collected in the middle of the rosette to drain off. Not typically frost hardy, they withstand cold (to 20 degrees) if kept protected (from frost) and dry (stop watering in late fall then begin sparingly in the spring). Many do well if grown under the protection of eaves or tall shrubs or trees, in a bright spot.  Flowers are long-lived in arrangements. Fantastic in containers, grouped with other succulents.
Elymus californicus  California bottlebrush grass
More information »

Elymus californicus

(California bottlebrush grass)

California bottlebrush grass is a tall robust grass with broad, bright green blades and nodding brushlike flower spikes. Uncommon in the wild it can be found in coastal counties on shaded banks and wooded areas, including redwood forests. Displays 3 - 6 ft. tall flower stalks with low foliage up to 1 ft. high. Provide moderate to infrequent irrigation. Deer resistant.

More information »

Elymus glaucus

(blue ryegrass)

A stiffly upright clump-forming grass with blue-green blades native to much of the western U. S.. The flowers form bristle-tipped narrow, vertical spikes, rising 2-3 feet tall. Easy to grow and a strong reseeder for full sun to light shade. Summer water keeps plants green longer, will go dormant with drought. Adaptable. Deer resistant.

More information »

Elymus triticoides

(creeping wild rye)

Spreading, turf forming, perennial grass found in somewhat moist areas in many plant communities throughout California. An important restoration species useful for holding soil and enhancing wildlife habitat value. Growing 1-3 ft. tall and spreading widely with an extensive network of rhizomatous roots which both hold soil and help prevent exotic weed establishment within their dense mats of roots and foliage. Slender blue-green blades are topped with narrow flower spikes. Excellent for moist bottom land and riparian areas where it can grow in full sun to light shade and tolerates many soil types. Will tolerate some drought in heavier soils. May be too vigorous for small gardens.
Elymus (Leymus) condensatus 'Canyon Prince' giant ryegrass
More information »

Elymus (Leymus) condensatus 'Canyon Prince'

(giant ryegrass)

Beautiful selection from the Channel Islands off Southern California. Lovely silver-blue blades 2 1/2 to 3 ft. tall and spreading. Sun to very light shade, moderate to little water. Tolerates heavy soil. Spreads by rhizomes, vigorously and invasively. Best to use where a large patch is desired.  Drought and deer tolerant.
Elymus (Leymus) condensatus 'Lottie's Choice' giant wild rye
More information »

Elymus (Leymus) condensatus 'Lottie's Choice'

(giant wild rye)

An exceptional form of giant wild rye selected by Roger Raiche from the Santa Lucia Mts. in southern Monterey County. A big, bold and beautiful native grass with stunning, wide, silver blades 4 ft. or more tall. Dense flower spikes rise on tall stems  to 7 ft. or more in the summer. Spreads slowly to form substantial clumps. A dramatic specimen that needs room to sprawl, and benefits from adjacent shrubs or structures to lean on. Cutting down old growth each spring will renew and showcase the gorgeous new stems and leaves. Best in full sun to light shade with moderate to infrequent water once established. Deer resistant.

More information »

Elymus (Leymus) triticoides

(creeping wild rye)

Native perennial grass that spreads by creeping rhizomes to form a dense colony. Blades have a bluish cast and grow 2 - 4 ft. tall. The flowers are narrow spikes 4 to 6 inches long on tall stems that emerge green and mature to a wheat color. Tolerates a wide range of conditions, but prefers moist, fertile soils in full sun to light shade. Does well in heavy clay soils. An excellent choice for erosion control. May be too invasive for small gardens or mixed borders. Deer resistant.
Encelia californica 'El Dorado' bush sunflower
More information »

Encelia californica 'El Dorado'

(bush sunflower)

Plant description coming soon.
Epilobium  'Chaparral Silver' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium 'Chaparral Silver'

(California fuchsia)

This California fuchsia that we obtained from another grower appears to be identical to our ‘Roger’s U. C. Hybrid’ - same lovely gray foliage 12 -18 inches tall, spreading, with narrow red tubular flowers that the hummingbirds love. Provide full sun. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year.
Epilobium  'Roger's U.C. Hybrid' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium 'Roger's U.C. Hybrid'

(California fuchsia)

A California fuchsia that is upright in habit with narrow silver-gray foliage and slender trumpet-shaped blossoms of orange-red. Reaches a height of about 1 1/2 ft. and spreads easily. Very similar to the selections ‘Carman’s Gray’  and ‘Chaparral Silver’. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Hummingbird favorite. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year.
Epilobium  'Schieffelin's Choice' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium 'Schieffelin's Choice'

(California fuchsia)

This California fuchsia grows close to the ground - 8 inches tall with arching flower stalks. Gray foliage makes a wonderful foil for the bright orangey-red tubular flowers which appear summer through fall. Believed to be a cross between E. septentrionale and E. canum. Provide full sun to very light shade. One of the more drought tolerant selections but flowers best with occasional deep watering. Hummingbird favorite. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year. Perhaps more deer resistant than other California fuchsias.
Epilobium canum 'Bowman's Hybrid' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Bowman's Hybrid'

(California fuchsia)

This California fuchsia has distinctive narrow, olive-green foliage and an upright habit about 2-3 ft. tall and spreading widely. The orange-red tubular flowers are petite but profuse. Plant in sunny areas. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvinate them for the following year. Hummingbird favorite.
Epilobium canum 'Brilliant Smith' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Brilliant Smith'

(California fuchsia)

This California fuchsia grows 8 inches or so tall with wide green leaves. Especially large red tubular flowers appear in summer and continue into fall. 'Brilliant Smith' is one of the reddest California fuchsias. The habit of this plant can be improved with shearing in the winter. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Hummingbird favorite.
Epilobium canum 'Calistoga' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Calistoga'

(California fuchsia)

Phil Van Soelen’s selection of California fuchsia from the Palisades east of Calistoga. Forms a spreading mat of unusually wide, fuzzy, gray leaves. The flowers are the typical hummingbird attracting orange-red trumpet shape and appear on stalks reaching up to 18 inches high. For sunny areas. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year.
Epilobium canum 'Carman's Grey' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Carman's Grey'

(California fuchsia)

Plant description coming soon.
Epilobium canum 'Catalina' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Catalina'

(California fuchsia)

An outstanding selection of California fuchsia growing 3 ft. tall or more. This may be the tallest cultivar available, sometimes reaching as much as 5 ft. tall. The foliage is silvery-gray with an abundance of large, brilliant orangey-red tubular flowers late summer through fall. This species from southern California is particularly drought tolerant. Hummingbird favorite. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year.
Epilobium canum 'Cloverdale' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Cloverdale'

(California fuchsia)

This form of California fuchsia was selected by U.C. Santa Cruz Arboretum from along the Russian River north of Cloverdale. Low, slightly mounding fuzzy olive-green foliage with an abundance of orangey-red tubular flowers the hummingbirds love. Usually stays bellow one ft. in height. 'Cloverdale' is one of the most orange selections of California fuchsia. Plant in full sun. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year.
Epilobium canum 'Coral Canyon' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Coral Canyon'

(California fuchsia)

Plant description coming soon.
Epilobium canum 'Everett's Choice' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Everett's Choice'

(California fuchsia)

A low, spreading form of Californica fuchsia staying below one ft. in height. Distinctive for its fuzzy, gray-green foliage with many scarlet tubular flowers from summer through to fall. Good for sunny areas, though tolerates light shade. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Attracts hummingbirds. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year.
Epilobium canum 'Garrison Canyon' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Garrison Canyon'

(California fuchsia)

This local selection of California fuchsia comes from the high banks of Rogers Creek, a seasonal creek in the hills above Mark West, in Sonoma County. Great for hot inland sites, this tough perennial forms a low, loose, floriferous mat over time. Orange-red tubular flowers bloom in abundance from early summer through fall.  Full sun to part shade with occasional deep watering in the summer. Hummingbird favorite. 

More information »

Epilobium canum 'John Bixby'

(California fuchsia)

A Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden introduction, 'John Bixby' is a chance seedling of Epilobium 'Everett's Choice'. Forming a broad patch with a dense rounded form of grey-green foliage 12 -18 inches tall or more.  Showy, vivid red-orange tubular flowers put on a spectacular display from summer into fall and are highly attractive to hummingbirds. Vigorous perennial, spreading by underground rhizomes to form large colonies. Plant in full sun to light shade with occasional deep watering for best appearance. Cutting plants down after flowering rejuvinates them for the following year.  
Epilobium canum 'Liz's Choice' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Liz's Choice'

(California fuchsia)

This selection of California fuchsia features particularly large, trumpet-shaped, scarlet flowers atop stems reaching 3 ft. tall. The flowers, blooming from summer into fall, are a favorite of hummingbirds and bees. The lance-shaped leaves are a pewter green, providing a striking contrast to the brilliant flowers. It spreads over time to create small colonies. Trim plants down to about 4 inches in winter for vigorous, tidy growth the next year. Provide moderate to infrequent irrigation and full sun. This beautiful cultivar was selected by Milo Baker Chapter CNPS Fellow Liz Parsons.
Epilobium canum 'Marin Pink' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Marin Pink'

(California fuchsia)

California fuchsias are appreciated for their abundant tubular flowers that bloom in late summer and fall, predominantly in different shades of orange-red. This unusual selection has beautiful PINK tubular flowers produced on sage green mounds of foliage to about 2 ft. tall and spreading by underground rhizomes. Vigorous and easy to grow in full sun to very light shade. Touted as drought tolerant, they will survive dry conditions but will thrive with occasional summer water. Beautiful against a rock wall, in dry stream beds, or naturalistic plantings where they have some room to spread. Hummingbird favorite. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year.
Epilobium canum 'Solidarity Pink' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Solidarity Pink'

(California fuchsia)

A California fuchsia color breakthrough discovered in the Sierra foothills. Forms a loose, billowy plant 10 - 12 inches tall with flesh pink colored tubular blossoms. Looks great spilling over walls. Sun to light shade. Flowers best with occasional deep watering. Hummingbird favorite. The habit of this plant can be improved with shearing in the winter.
Epilobium canum 'Summer Snow' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium canum 'Summer Snow'

(California fuchsia)

Known for their abundant showy red flowers, this variety offers surprising clean-white blossoms on low growing green foliage up to 10 inches tall. Spreading by underground rhizomes, this mat forming perennial grows in full sun to light shade with occasional to little summer water once established. Perfect in naturalistic plantings, on slopes amongst boulders, dry creek beds or rock walls. California fuchsias bloom heavily late summer into fall and their tubular flowers are hummingbird favorites. The habit of this plant can be improved with shearing in the winter.
Epilobium septentrionale 'Select Mattole' California fuchsia
More information »

Epilobium septentrionale 'Select Mattole'

(California fuchsia)

This California fuchsia forms tidy, low, 6 inch high mats of beautiful silver foliage with a matte finish. Late summer through fall brings orangey-red tubular flowers which attract hummingbirds. A somewhat redder flowering selection. Spreading by underground rhizomes, this Epilobium increases a little less vigorously than the others. Full sun to light shade. More shade tolerant than most California fuschias. Needs more water than most Epilobiums. Pruning plants down to a few inches in late autumn helps to rejuvenate them for the following year.

More information »

Epilobium septentrionale 'Wayne's Silver'

(California fuchsia)

The silver leaves and bright red trumpet-shaped flowers make this California fuchsia a knockout in the native garden.  Only getting about 10 inches tall and slowly spreading to form drifts, this is a great ground cover for full sun to light shade. A little shade in hot interior areas may be required. This selection spreads less aggressive than most other California fuchsia. Provide moderate to occasional irrigation once established. Looks best if sheared to the the ground every winter for healthy, vigorous growth the next spring. VERY similar to 'Select Mattole'. A favorite of hummingbirds and bees.
Epipactus gigantea  stream orchid
More information »

Epipactus gigantea

(stream orchid)

Here’s a native orchid that’s easy in cultivation. In time it will form a colony producing many flower stems. Each stem holds several interesting orchid blossoms of subtle orange, coral and green tones 12 - 18 inches tall. Dies back to the ground in winter. Best with decent drainage and regular to moderate moisture (NOT soggy soils) and dappled shade part of the day. Wonderful addition to the woodland garden, around pond or near streams. Good in containers too.
Epipactus gigantea 'Serpentine Night' stream orchid
More information »

Epipactus gigantea 'Serpentine Night'

(stream orchid)

The stream orchid is found in perennial streams, seepages, or other permanently moist places in California. Spreads by runners and will form a colony producing many flower stems. Each stem holds several orchid blosssoms of subtle orange tones 12 - 18 inches tall. The cultivar ‘Serpentine Night’ has wonderful dark purple foliage, emerging in the spring almost black. As the season progresses the color changes to dark bronze then bronzy green. Goes dormant in winter. Best with good light but may need afternoon shade in hot areas. Easy to grow with regular to moderate water. Excellent in containers.
Equisetum hyemale v. robustum  horsetail
More information »

Equisetum hyemale v. robustum

(horsetail)

Horsetail’s wonderful, erect form can be very useful in the landscape BUT BEWARE of its invasive nature. Best confined to containers where its slender, hollow, segmented stems can rise 4 ft. tall or more. Provide sun to medium shade and regular water. Deer resistant.
Ericameria arborescens  goldenfleece
More information »

Ericameria arborescens

(goldenfleece)

Native to chaparral regions throughout California, this tall, billowy shrub stands out with its soft and narrow, bright green leaves and, in the summer and early fall, clusters of small yellow flowers. Goldenfleece reaches 6 ft. or more tall with a width of around 4 ft. A wonderful accent plant for the dry garden, especially when combined with dark-foliaged plants such as ceanothus, toyon and manzanitas. Prefers full sun and excellent drainage. Very drought tolerant once established. Excellent for bees and butterflies. Deer resistant.
Ericameria ericoides  mock heather
More information »

Ericameria ericoides

(mock heather)

Native to sand dunes from Long Beach north to Bodega Bay, this low shrub resembles a heather, covered with clusters of small yellow daisies in late summer and fall. Reaching a height of up to 3 feet and spreading to 4 feet, making it an ideal shrub for the smaller garden. Needs occasional water in interior locations and full sun to light shade. Requires well-draining soil. Plant with Ceanothus, low manzanitas and pacific reed grass for a taste of the coast in your own garden.Excellent late season nectar source for bees and butterflies. A light winter pruning will help keep it dense and compact. Said to be deer resistant.
Ericameria nauseosa v. speciosa  showy rabbitbrush
More information »

Ericameria nauseosa v. speciosa

(showy rabbitbrush)

This classic plant of the high desert grows in dry, hot, rocky areas throughout much of interior California and throughout the West. In summer and autumn, clusters of golden, star-like flowers cover the tips of the white branches on this low, rounded shrub which reaches up to 3 ft. tall and wide. Fine, white hairs cover the narrow leaves, giving the plant a ghostly grey-white appearance. Needs a sunny location with excellent drainage and little to no irrigation once established. Bees and butterflies love the flowers. A larval host for the northern checkerspot butterfly.
Erigeron  'Olga'
More information »

Erigeron 'Olga'

A fine seaside daisy hybrid introduced by Siskiyou Rare Plant Nursery in Oregon. Forms a tidy, dense mat of dark green foliage. Lavender daisies rise 12 inches above the compact foliage late spring into summer. Plant in full sun along the coast, part shade inland with moderate to occasional summer water. This compact grower is perfect for small spaces, troughs or containers. Bee and butterfly favorite.
Erigeron  'W.R.' seaside daisy
More information »

Erigeron 'W.R.'

(seaside daisy)

The "W. R." stands for the late Wayne Roderick, whom we can thank for many fine plant introductions. This hybrid involves the seaside daisy, Erigeron glaucus and some other native species more tolerant of heat. The lavender daisies sit on slender stalks about 10 inches above low rosettes of narrow leaves. The flowers bloom over a long period in summer and are very attractive to pollinators of all sorts. Provide full sun in cooler areas but will enjoy part shade in hot inland sites. Moderate to occasional irrigation. Their seeds are favored by juncos and finches. Wayne discovered this surpisingly heat tolerant selection on the Del Norte coast. This selection should not be confused with 'Wayne Roderick', which is an entirely diferent selection of Erigeron.

More information »

Erigeron glacialis

(subalpine fleabane)

From mountain meadows throughout much of California and the West comes this endearing little daisy. Features clusters of refined, lavender-pink daisies with yellow centers held on stalks up to 10 inches tall above low, mat-forming leaves. Plant in full sun except in hot, inland areas where some afternoon shade would be appreciated. Needs moderate irrigation. This summer bloomer provides excellent habitat for bees and butterflies. A superlative candidate for a rock garden or narrow planting bed. Works well in containers.
Erigeron glaucus  seaside daisy
More information »

Erigeron glaucus

(seaside daisy)

Low growing native perennial to 1 ft. tall with lovely, lavender, daisy-like flowers blooming over a long part of the year. Native to coastal dunes and bluffs, but does well inland with some afternoon shade and a little extra summer water. A natural along the coast where it thrives with little to no summer water and tolerates wind and salt spray. Good nectar source for butterflies and many different pollinators. Their seeds are favored by juncos and finches.
Erigeron glaucus 'Bountiful' seaside daisy
More information »

Erigeron glaucus 'Bountiful'

(seaside daisy)

Forms a lush mound of foliage 10 inches - 1 ft. tall by 2 ft. wide. Exceptionally floriferous and long blooming, 'Bountiful' offers masses of lavender daisies with yellow centers held above loose rosettes of green foliage. It slowly spreads to form drifts which combine wonderfully with Iris and low grasses.  A natural along the coast where it grows in full sun and is drought tolerant. Appreciates some afternoon shade and summer water inland. A reliable and easy to grow perennial. Butterfly and bee favorite. Their seeds are favored by juncos and finches.
Erigeron glaucus 'Cal Flora' seaside daisy
More information »

Erigeron glaucus 'Cal Flora'

(seaside daisy)

This seedling appeared at the base of a decorative pot planted with Erigeron glaucus ‘Cape Sebastian’. The seedling's foliage and form appears to be intermediate between Erigeron glaucus 'Cape Sebastian’ and Erigeron glaucus 'Bountiful'. It has a nice dense habit, though a bit taller than ‘Cape Sebastian', with larger and darker flowers held just above the foliage at about 10 inches in height. A natural along the coast where it thrives with little to no summer water once established and tolerates wind and salt spray. In hotter inland conditions give some afternoon shade and additional summer water. Good pollen and nectar source for bees and butterflies. Their seeds are favored by juncos and finches.
Erigeron glaucus 'Cape Sebastian' seaside daisy
More information »

Erigeron glaucus 'Cape Sebastian'

(seaside daisy)

This selection of the West Coast native seaside daisy is from Oregon, just north of the California border. A compact and dense mound up to 6 inches high, topped with lavender daisies over a long period. Full sun near coast, light shade in hot regions. Best with moderate to occasional summer water in hotter climates. A favorite of pollinators. Their seeds are favored by juncos and finches. 
Erigeron glaucus 'Ron's Pink' seaside daisy
More information »

Erigeron glaucus 'Ron's Pink'

(seaside daisy)

Description coming soon!
Erigeron glaucus 'Wayne Roderick' seaside daisy
More information »

Erigeron glaucus 'Wayne Roderick'

(seaside daisy)

This selection offers the darkest flowers of any of the seaside daisies. Deep purple petals surround golden discs on flowers 1 ½ inches wide. The prolific blooms begin in spring and can continue into autumn if the spent flowers are removed. Bright green leaves create a slowly spreading mound up to a foot high with the flowers perched just above. Plant in full sun near the coast but protect from the hot afternoon sun in inland locales. Enjoys moderate to occasional irrigation. The seaside daisies make a great addition to the meadow garden, combining beautifully with iris, blue fescues and spreading gumplant.
Erigeron glaucus 'White Lights' white seaside daisy
More information »

Erigeron glaucus 'White Lights'

(white seaside daisy)

This unusual white flowering form of seaside daisy was discovered along a coastal bluff in Sonoma County by Roger Raiche. It has been a long bloomer, starting in spring and continuing into autumn. Reaches a height of up to 1 ft. and spreads to form a small clump. Prefers sun, decent drainage, and is drought tolerant once established. A little shade and moderate to occasional water is best in hot inland sites. A member of the sunflower family, seaside daisies are excellent sources of both nectar and pollen for butterflies, bees and other pollinators. Their seeds are favored by juncos and finches.
Eriodictyon californicum  yerba santa
More information »

Eriodictyon californicum

(yerba santa)

Plant description coming soon.
Eriogonum  arborescens  Santa Cruz Island buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum arborescens

(Santa Cruz Island buckwheat)

A large, shrubby buckwheat with narrow, pale green foliage and sturdy, flat-topped inflorescences of creamy white to pink flowers. The flowers age over time, eventually turning reddish brown, remaining ornamental for a long period. Grows 3 to 4  ft. tall and slightly wider. Normal to very lean well-drained soils. Especially drought tolerant along the coast, may need infrequent summer water inland and possibly a little afternoon shade. Buckwheats are excellent additions to habitat gardens, providing pollen and nectar for bees and butterflies and seeds for many creatures. Deer resistant.
Eriogonum crocatum  saffron buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum crocatum

(saffron buckwheat)

A rare buckwheat grown for its beautiful gray, felty foliage and bright, clear yellow flowers. The yellow flowers open from brown buds and then age to a dark rusty brown. Grows 1 - 2 ft. tall and wide, this perennial requires full sun and good drainage. Little to no summer water once established. This Ventura County, California native is hardy to about 15°F. Good nectar source for bees and butterflies. Deer resistant.
Eriogonum fasciculatum  California buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum fasciculatum

(California buckwheat)

This adaptable buckwheat is a native of central and southern California. It is a pioneer plant capable of surviving and colonizing some of the hottest driest sites. These attributes are very useful in a garden setting but it should not be planted in or adjacent to wildlands where it may escape and displace local natives. Small native shrub, forming a broad mound 2 - 3 ft. high and about 3 ft. wide. Flower clusters are creamy white to pink, turning an attractive rust color with age. Good erosion control plant - best in a well drained, sunny site. Flowers attractive to bees and butterflies. Deer resistant.
Eriogonum fasciculatum 'Warriner Lytle' California buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum fasciculatum 'Warriner Lytle'

(California buckwheat)

An interesting form of California buckwheat introduced by the Theodore Payne Foundation. Grows quickly into a low and spreading evergreen groundcover clothed with small, needle-like leaves, 18 inches tall and 6 to 8 feet wide. From late spring to early fall, tight clusters of creamy-whitish pink flowers appear which are very attractive to bees and butterflies. As the flowers go to seed they gradually turn dark russet and are attractive to seed eating birds and mammals. Excellent for dry slopes where it will grow in full sun to light shade with good drainage. Quite drought tolerant once established. Deer resistant.  
Eriogonum giganteum  St. Catherine's Lace
More information »

Eriogonum giganteum

(St. Catherine's Lace)

Native to the Channel Islands of Southern California, this buckwheat can grow to be a very large, mounding shrub with gray felted leaves 3 - 4 ft. tall or more. The flower stalks have large, flat sprays of cream-colored to pale pink flowers in summer and are prized by arrangers of dried bouquets. Flowers are attractive to bees and butterflies and birds enjoy the seeds. Best in sunny well-drained sites. Drought tolerant but in hot inland situations they look best with occasional deep waterings in summer.
Eriogonum grande var. rubescens  red buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum grande var. rubescens

(red buckwheat)

Small, choice, native perennial for a sunny spot. A low mound of grey-green foliage with flower stems up to a foot tall with flat heads of intense rosy-pink. Buckwheats have substantial wildlife value, providing pollen and nectar for bees and butterflies, larval food for butterflies, seeds for birds and cover for many creatures.  Drought tolerant once established. An excellent rock garden plant.
Eriogonum heracleoides  Wyeth buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum heracleoides

(Wyeth buckwheat)

Plant description coming soon.
Eriogonum latifolium  coastal bluff buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum latifolium

(coastal bluff buckwheat)

Native to our coastal bluffs, this perennial forms neat mounds of silvery white foliage under 1 ft. tall. Flowers develop in dense pom-poms and are creamy white to pinkish. Tolerates sun, wind and drought once established but needs decent drainage. Provide occasional summer irrigation to keep them looking their best. Buckwheats have substantial wildlife value, providing pollen and nectar for bees and butterflies, larval food for butterflies, seeds for birds and cover for many creatures. Deer resistant.
Eriogonum nudum  naked buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum nudum

(naked buckwheat)

  Few natives are as excellent a source of nectar for bees and butterflies as the buckwheats. This widely distributed species is known for its elegant flower displays on naked stems rising one to three feet above low mounds of grey-green leaves. Naked buckwheat has flower pom-poms ranging in color from white to pink set on slender stems in open clusters up to twelve inches wide. Blooms from late spring into early autumn. Provide full sun to very light shade in soil with decent drainage. Drought tolerant once established. Generally deer resistant.  
Eriogonum nudum 'Ella Nelson's Yellow' naked buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum nudum 'Ella Nelson's Yellow'

(naked buckwheat)

The naked buckwheat has the widest distribution of all the buckwheats, occurring from the coast to timberline in the mountains. This interesting seed strain was collected by Eric Nelson along the middle fork of the Eel River in Mendocino County and named for his grandmother. Instead of the more common white or pink flowers of the species, this strain has beautiful yellow flowers. The spoon shaped leaves which form a low rosette are grey green on top and white and wooly beneath. Late spring brings a multitude of small, bright yellow flowers carried on the bare, leafless stems 12-18 inches above the foliage. Best on well drained soils in full sun where they are drought tolerant once established. Buckwheats are highly attractive to nectar feeding insects. Deer resistant.

More information »

Eriogonum nudum - robust form

(naked buckwheat)

This buckwheat came to us by way of Ginny Hunt and her seed company Seedhunt. Collected from a local race (Santa Cruz area) of naked buckwheat where the flower stems rise to 5 foot or more! Naked buckwheat is the most widely distributed species of buckwheat, growing throughout the state. Forms low mounds of foliage with tall, slender, naked stems, topped with clusters of white to pinkish pom-poms. Plant in full sun to very light shade with good drainage. Drought tolerant once established. Important pollinator plant. Said to be deer resisitant.            

More information »

Eriogonum parvifolium 'Moss Landing'

(seacliff buckwheat)

Native to coastal bluffs of the central and south coast. Forms a mounding shrub 2 ft. or more tall by 2 – 3 ft. wide with thick, dark green, triangular shaped leaves often with a reddish tinge, and white and woolly beneath. Round pom-poms of white to pink flowers over a long period late spring and summer, fade to an attractive russet brown. A natural for coastal areas where it grows fast in full sun with good drainage and is very drought tolerant once established. Inland, a little afternoon shade is recommended. Looks great on slopes or draping over walls.  An important pollinator plant, appealing to a wide array of insects. In its native range, the rare and endangered El Segundo blue butterfly relies exclusively on this species in all stages of its life cycle. Deer tolerant.        
Eriogonum umbellatum  sulphur flower buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum umbellatum

(sulphur flower buckwheat)

Intense yellow flowers in flat-topped clusters sit atop short stems above grey to green foliage. Ranging in height from 10 to 18 inches, this highly variable and widely distributed California native is an excellent addition to the drought tolerant garden. Provide decent drainage and occasional to no irrigation once established. Full sun to light shade. Just like all buckwheats, this species is loved by bees and butterflies. The foliage is deer resistant but they may nibble the flowers.
Eriogonum umbellatum var. aureum 'Kannah Creek' golden sulphur flower buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum umbellatum var. aureum 'Kannah Creek'

(golden sulphur flower buckwheat)

Selected from the Kannah Creek region of Western Colorado, this durable perennial will make a fine addition to the dry garden. Forms low mats of leathery leaves 12-24 inches wide, which turn shades of red and purple in the autumn. Masses of bright yellow flowers on stalks 12-15 inches tall appear late spring to early summer and deepen in color to orange as they age. Plant in full sun to light shade with occasional to little water. Drought tolerant once established. Buckwheats attract an array of beneficial insects, provide pollen and nectar for bees and butterflies and seeds for birds.
Eriogonum umbellatum var. polyanthum 'Shasta Sulphur' sulphur flower buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum umbellatum var. polyanthum 'Shasta Sulphur'

(sulphur flower buckwheat)

A striking selection of the sulphur flower buckwheat. Great choice for a dry sunny border or rock garden with decent drainage. Grows 1+1/2 ft. tall by 2 ft. broad. Smothered with clusters of intensely yellow flowers in spring which fade to orange russet then coppery brown. Needs full sun to bright shade and is drought tolerant once established. Buckwheats have substantial wildlife value, providing pollen and nectar for bees and butterflies, larval food for butterflies, seeds for birds and cover for many creatures. Deer resistant.
Eriogonum vimineum  wicker buckwheat
More information »

Eriogonum vimineum

(wicker buckwheat)

Here is an ANNUAL buckwheat found throughout much of California, growing on gravely and volcanic soils. Summer brings showy domes of rose-pink flowers held on wiry stems 18 inches above small clumps of basal leaves. Buckwheats are excellent for attracting beneficial insects providing pollen and nectar for bees and butterflies and seeds for birds. Plant in full sun with little water once established. Good container plant too.

More information »

Eriophyllum confertiflorum

(golden yarrow)

Native to dry sites in many plant communities of California. Forms a mound of pale green, finely cut foliage with woolly undersides 12-24 inches tall. Late spring and summer brings domes of bright golden yellow daisies in dense heads. Tough little shrublet for the dry garden in full sun where its interesting fine-textured foliage provides a useful contrast to grasses and bold-leaved shrubs and perennials. The flowers provide nectar to bees and butterflies. Needs good drainage.
Eriophyllum lanatum 'Horseshoe Cove' woolly sunflower
More information »

Eriophyllum lanatum 'Horseshoe Cove'

(woolly sunflower)

This western native grows on rocky slopes and bluffs over a wide range of plant communities in California, Oregon and Washington. This low dense coastal selection forms a mat of woolly, bright green foliage just a few inches tall and 1-2 ft. across, topped with cheerful golden yellow daisies rising to 6 inches tall, late spring and summer. The flowers are attractive to bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects. Larval host plant for the painted lady butterfly. Plant in full sun to light shade inland with good drainage and moderate summer water.
Eriophyllum lanatum 'Siskiyou' woolly sunflower
More information »

Eriophyllum lanatum 'Siskiyou'

(woolly sunflower)

An extremely variable species ranging from the immediate coast to the high mountains of California and into Oregon. The cultivar 'Siskiyou' is a Siskiyou Rare Plant Nursery selection. Lush gray-green woolly foliage forms low mats up to 10 inches and 2-3 feet wide. Blooms over a long period, spring into fall with cheery 2 inch golden-yellow daisies. This tough perennial will thrive in full sun to light shade, decent drainage and moderate to infrequent summer water once established. The open faced daisies are an excellent sources of pollen and nectar and make good platforms for insects to perch, attracting butterflies, bees and other insects. Larval host plant for the painted lady butterfly.      
Eriophyllum staechadifolium  lizard tail
More information »

Eriophyllum staechadifolium

(lizard tail)

This native perennial is perfect for coastal environments where it tolerates full sun, wind, salt spray and drought. Forms leafy mounds 1 - 3 ft. tall and wide. The foliage is dark green above and silvery beneath with flower heads densley packed with tiny golden-yellow daisies over a long period. Drought tolerant but appreciates occasional summer waterings. Excellent for pollinators.  
Erysimum concinnum  Point Reyes wallflower
More information »

Erysimum concinnum

(Point Reyes wallflower)

Plant description coming soon!
Erysimum franciscanum  San Francisco wallflower
More information »

Erysimum franciscanum

(San Francisco wallflower)

This rare and threatened species makes its home in the sand dunes and hills of the San Francisco Bay area.  Development has seriously impacted its native habitat.  Fragrant, four-petaled flowers ranging in color from creamy white to yellow rise up to 18” above dark green foliage in the spring and early summer.  Thrives with good drainage and occasional water once established.  Plant this special wallflower in full sun with other small perennials such as buckwheats, checkermallows and coyote mint. Attractive to butterflies.      

More information »

Erysimum menziesii

(Menzie's wallflower)

  A rare species native to sand dunes along the north coast of California. Forms tight mounds of narrow leaves 8-12 inches tall and wide.  Bright-yellow fragrant flowers bloom in late spring and will continue into summer with a little additional summer watering. The fragrant flowers are butterfly favorites. Adaptable and can seed about if happy, though not weedy. Requires good drainage, full sun, to light shade inland, with moderate to occasional summer water. Said to be deer tolerant.   
Erysimum menziesii var. yadonii  Yadon's wallflower
More information »

Erysimum menziesii var. yadonii

(Yadon's wallflower)

Menzies’ wallflower is a rare plant found in coastal dune plant communities from Humboldt County to Monterey County. The variety yadonii has a limited distribution on the Monterey Coast.  A short lived perennial which forms a rosette of dark-green fleshy spoon-shaped leaves. Dense clusters of bright-yellow fragrant flowers bloom in the spring. A natural along the coast where it will thrive in sun with good drainage and moderate to infrequent water. Light shade in hot regions. A perfect companion with other coastal bluff plants such as seaside daisy, sea thrift, Douglas Iris or checkerbloom. Bee and butterfly favorite.

More information »

Erythronium oregonum

(giant fawn lily)

The giant fawn lily adds a delicate accent in the spring to the bright shade garden featuring starlike flowers of creamy-white with yellow centers. Reaching to a height of about 1 ft when in bloom with low, broad leaves attractively mottled. This bulb will slowly increase to form little clumps, ideal for the forest rock garden. Provide good drainage and water infrequently during its summer dormancy. 
Eschscholzia californica - cream colored flowers  cream colored California poppy
More information »

Eschscholzia californica - cream colored flowers

(cream colored California poppy)

Smaller in stature than the typical robust orange forms of California poppy, this perennial fits into plantings nicely without overwhelming. Low foliage is ferny and finely dissected and topped with cup-shaped blossoms that are a lovely shade of cream to pale yellow. Best in full sun with dryish conditions. Given the opportunity may seed about. Flowers provide pollen that is favored by native bees, bumbles and honey bees.  
Eschscholzia californica var. maritima  California poppy coastal form
More information »

Eschscholzia californica var. maritima

(California poppy coastal form)

This is the perennial, coastal form of California poppy. Low growing and spreading with beautiful, finely cut, blue-gray foliage. Abundant flowers are golden yellow with orange centers, blooming over a long period, especially in mild climates. Plants retreat to leafy rosettes in winter. Best in full sun where they are drought tolerant, but a little summer water can extend their bloom period. Seeds about if happy.

More information »

Euonymus occidentalis

(western burning bush)

Native to moist canyons, the uncommon western burning bush features small, burgundy flowers in the spring followed by dangling orangey-red fruits. The subtle appeal of this medium sized, deciduous shrub will please those native plant enthusiasts looking for a rare find. Reaches a height and width of about 8 ft. in most garden settings and is amenable to pruning. Plant in part shade to full shade. Enjoys moist situations but may become tolerant of drought in shadier locations. Needs good drainage.

More information »

Eupatorium maculatum 'Gateway'

(Joe Pye weed)

This selection of the delightful East Coast native Joe Pye weed was chosen for its compact habit and large, billowy flower heads of purplish-pink. Stems are wine-red and grow 4 - 6 ft. tall and steadily increase to form broad drifts. Dies back in the winter but vigorously re-emerge in spring. The mid-summer flowers are favored by butterflies and bees, the seeds that follow are relished by gold finches. Best with regular to moderate water and full sun. Sweetly fragrant.
Euphorbia  'Limewall'
More information »

Euphorbia 'Limewall'

A splendid hybrid euphorbia with narrow, blue-green leaves growing to about 1 ft. tall and 2 ft. wide. Each branch tip is topped with a head of chartreuse bracts over a long period, from spring into summer. Plant in sunny areas with good drainage and moderate to a little summer water. The flowers attract pollinators. Beware of milky sap which can be very irritating to skin and eyes. Deer resistant.

More information »

Euphorbia characias 'Humpty Dumpty'

(Mediterranean spurge)

  A compact form of the species, growing into a rounded evergreen bush, 2-1/2 to 3 ft. tall and wide. Narrow, blue-green leaves line the rubbery upright branches. Large, round floral heads made up of bright, lime-green, showy bracts begin in the spring and persist into summer. The flowers are attractive to an array of pollinators. Easy to grow in sun to light shade, where they are fairly drought tolerant once established. The milky sap is a skin irritant and makes the plant deer resistant.  

More information »

Euphorbia dulcis 'Chameleon'

(spurge)

Grown for its beautiful burgundy foliage, this perennial forms a mound 12-18 inches tall and wide. The small clusters of greenish - yellow flowers bloom in late spring to early summer and contrast nicely with the dark foliage. An interesting foliage effect for sun to light shade (especially in hot regions) and moderate water. This perennial will reseed in areas with available moisture. Attracts pollinators. Beware of the irritating milky sap which makes it deer resistant.
Euphorbia myrsinites  myrtle spurge
More information »

Euphorbia myrsinites

(myrtle spurge)

Valued for its blue-gray, fleshy foliage along snake-like stems which grow 6-8 inches tall and 1 ft. wide. Clusters of chartreuse yellow flowers in early spring. Useful in raised beds or rock gardens in sun to light shade. Attracts pollinators. Tolerates heat, cold, drought and deer. Beware of milky sap which can be very irritating to skin and eyes, but does make it deer resistant.  
A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Z