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Salix breweri 'Cedar's Gold' Brewer's willow
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Salix breweri 'Cedar's Gold'

(Brewer's willow)

Product description coming soon.
Salvia  'Aromas' Aromas sage
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Salvia 'Aromas'

(Aromas sage)

A hybrid between Salvia clevelandii  & Salvia leucophylla, this aromatic shrubby sage grows 4 ft. tall and 4 ft. wide. Early summer brings flower stalks with whorls of lavender-blue blossoms. Good for sunny areas with good drainage. Occasional to little summer water. Flowers are attractive to bees, hummingbirds and butterflies. Deer and drought tolerant. 
Salvia  'Bee's Bliss' sage
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Salvia 'Bee's Bliss'

(sage)

A beautiful native hybrid sage grows around 18 inches tall by 5 ft. wide or more. The handsome gray foliage is topped with a profusion of lavender flowers on long spikes in the spring. Sun, decent drainage, occasional to little water. Deer tolerant. A bee and hummingbird favorite.
Salvia  'Calamity Jane' calamity Jane sage
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Salvia 'Calamity Jane'

(calamity Jane sage)

A cross between Salvia leucophylla and a prostrate form of Salvia mellifera.  Forms a fragrant mounding shrub up to 4 ft. tall by 4 ft. wide,  with flower spikes of light lavender blossoms. An excellent choice for a dry sunny bank with little to no summer water once established. Flowers are highly attractive to bees and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.

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Salvia 'Elk Blue Note'

(sage)

This cultivar introduced by Flowers by the Sea in Elk, California, is a result of a hybridizing program using a seed grown variety from Europe called 'Blue Note'. 'Elk Blue Note' offers a tough and reliable, dense, mounding shrub, 2 ft. tall by 3 ft. across. Royal blue-purple flowers on wiry stems bloom off and on throughout the growing season. Shearing back spent flowers leads to more blooming. Plant in full sun to very light shade with moderate watering. Sages are highly attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.
Salvia  'Hot Lips' sage
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Salvia 'Hot Lips'

(sage)

Here is a unique sage which adds a sparkling effect with its wonderful two-toned red and white flowers. Fast growing aromatic foliage reaches a height and width of 3 ft. or more. The bicolor flowers are white with a red lip, but this sage has the habit of producing a few entirely white or red flowers along with the red & white blossoms. Has proven adaptable, growing in full sun to part shade, with regular as well as minimal irrigation. Attractive to hummingbirds and a multitude of other pollinators too. Deer resistant.
Salvia  'John Whittlesey'
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Salvia 'John Whittlesey'

A cross between Salvia darcyii and Salvia microphylla, this hybrid sage is valuable for it's very long bloom season. The large red flowers are a shade of red that is easy to work with and blends well with other colors. Growing 2 ft. by 2 ft. this fragrant perennial  benefits from pinching and occasional shearing to keep dense. Plant in sun to light shade with moderate to a little summer water. Sages are favorites of hummingbirds and bees and tend to be deer tolerant.
Salvia  'Little Kiss'
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Salvia 'Little Kiss'

If you enjoy Salvia 'Hot Lips' but need something smaller try Salvia 'Little Kiss'. Growing 18 - 24 inches tall by 18 - 24 inches wide, with all the qualities of 'Hot Lips' such as easy care, low water needs, pollinator and hummingbird attracting bicolor red and white flowers, blooming spring through fall. Sages tend to be deer resistant too.     
Salvia  'Mrs. Beard'
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Salvia 'Mrs. Beard'

This cultivar has been around since 1965, a chance seedling discovered in a Berkeley garden. A hybrid between Salvia sonomensis and Salvia mellifera, 'Mrs. Beard’ has proven durable and disease resistant. Forms a dense mat of gray fragrant foliage up to 2 ft. tall and 4-6 ft. wide. Spring brings an abundance of tiny pale lavender-blue flowers in ball-like clusters that are highly attractive to bees and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun along coast and light shade in hot inland sites, where it will be quite drought tolerant once established. Deer resistant.  

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Salvia 'Phyllis' Fancy'

A lovely sage with lush looking foliage 4 - 5 ft. tall by 4 ft. wide. Begins blooming in late summer and will flower till frost with graceful flower stems of lavender blossoms with purplish bracts. Doesn’t need grooming to look good. Plant in sun to light shade with moderate water. Dies back to its roots with hard frosts.
Salvia  'Scarlet Spires' sage
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Salvia 'Scarlet Spires'

(sage)

A hybrid sage involving Salvia darcyi, which has a compact habit growing around 3 ft. or so tall by 3 ft. wide. Summer brings displays of large coral-red blossoms, a delight to bees and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun to light shade with decent drainage and moderate watering. Dies back in the winter. Deer resistant.   

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Salvia 'Shirley's Creeper'

A vigorous garden hybrid involving the native Salvia mellifera selected by Charlie Christiansen. The cultivar name is misleading. This shrub does not creep exactly but mounds up 4-6 ft. tall and wide.  It can be kept lower and more dense by an annual cutting back after flowering.  Dark green aromatic foliage is a nice foil for the whorls of white flowers in the spring which are a favorite of bees and hummingbirds.  Plant in full sun to light shade.  Very drought tolerant once established.  Dependably deer resistant.
Salvia apiana  white sage
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Salvia apiana

(white sage)

A striking native sage with large, silvery-white, aromatic leaves and tall flower stalks reaching above the foliage displaying lavender tinged white blossoms. This shruby sage reaches 2 - 4 ft. tall and wide with flowering stalks adding another 2 ft. or more above that. A Useful plant for sunny, dry areas with good drainage. Combine with dark leaved plants such as ceanothus and manzanitas to create a dramatic display. Used in smudge bundles as a natural incense. A bee and hummingbird favorite. Deer resistant.

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Salvia apiana 'compacta'

(compact white sage)

Having all the attributes of white sage, but growing about half the size, topping out at around 3 ft. tall. Gorgeous silver-gray foliage and stately flower stems of white, pollinator attracting blossoms. Heat and drought tolerant, this striking sage makes a wonderful specimen and contrasts beautifully with greener foliage. Plant in full sun with good drainage where it thrives with summer heat and drought. The powerfully fragrant foliage is dependably deer resistant.  
Salvia barrelieri
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Salvia barrelieri

Native to Southern Spain and North West Africa, this herbaceous perennial spends much of the growing season as a low mound of gray-green wavy leaves. Early summer, tall flower stems rise 3 - 5 feet, with branched spikes of lovely light lavender-blue blossoms, that last about one month. Cut down old spikes or allow to go to seed for future propagation. Plant in sun with good drainage and moderate summer water. Pollinators of all sorts love sages.
Salvia brandegeei  Brandegee sage
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Salvia brandegeei

(Brandegee sage)

Native to Santa Rosa Island of the California Channel Islands, this large sage grows 4-5 foot tall and wide. Dark green textured leaves contrast nicely with gray foliaged plants. Spring brings pale lavender flowers in widely spaced whorls. Excellent for sunny areas where it is very drought tolerant. A bee and hummingbird favorite. Deer tolerant too.
Salvia brandegeei 'Pacific Blue' Brandegee sage
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Salvia brandegeei 'Pacific Blue'

(Brandegee sage)

A very nice form of a tough and durable native shrubby sage introduced by Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. Growing 4-6 ft. tall and wide with dark green textured foliage with white hairs on the leaf undersides. Instead of the typical light lavender flowers, this cultivar offers dark lavender-blue blossoms. Plant in full sun with little to no summer water once established. This native sage seems very tolerant of soil types even managing on heavy clay. Sage flowers attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds, their seeds provide food for birds. Deer resistant.
Salvia  canescens v. daghestanica  Caucasus sage
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Salvia canescens v. daghestanica

(Caucasus sage)

Native to the Caucasus Mountains, this sage of small stature and gorgeous silver foliage is perfect for tucking into small spaces. Growing just 8 - 10 inches tall and 12 -18 inches wide the frosty-silver leaves are the perfect foil for the blue-purple flowers in whorls.  Best in full sun to very light shade with good drainage, where it will be drought tolerant once established. Extremely cold tolerant too. A natural for rock or crevice gardens, along edges or in containers. Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.    
Salvia chamaedryoides  germander sage
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Salvia chamaedryoides

(germander sage)

Forms a beautiful, compact silver-gray sub-shrub, growing 2 feet tall by 3 feet wide. Flowers over a long period starting in spring with deep true blue flowers. Requires good drainage and full sun. Drought tolerant once established but best with occasional deep summer waterings. Pollinator favorite and deer resistant.
Salvia chamaedryoides 'Marine Blue' germander sage
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Salvia chamaedryoides 'Marine Blue'

(germander sage)

This hybrid of germander sage hails from Australia and offers repeat blooming from early summer through fall. It is a little larger in all it's part than the species, growing around 2 ft. tall and wide. Best in full sun with good drainage, where it will be drought tolerant once established but best with occasional water. Bee favorite and deer resistant.
Salvia  chiapensis
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Salvia chiapensis

Native to cloud forests of Chiapas,Mexico,this lovely sage will not survive freezing cold winter temperatures.With a little protection we have kept it going through many winters. Deep green, glossy leaves grow on decumbent stems 1 1/2 - 2 ft. tall and wide. The bright fuchsia-pink flowers begin blooming in summer and continue into fall and beyond. Best with light shade and regular water. Excellent container plant or hanging basket. Bring into a greenhouse before frost,or in milder zones, place under an eave or other protected spot where it has survived for us outdoors even with freezing temperatures. Hummingbird favorite.
Salvia clevelandii 'Allen Chickering' sage
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Salvia clevelandii 'Allen Chickering'

(sage)

Delightfully fragrant hybrid sage between S. clevelandii and S. leucophylla. Blue lavender flowers in whorls during summer. Grows 3 - 4 ft. tall and wide. Good for dry sunny areas. Attractive to hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. Deer resistant. 

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Salvia clevelandii 'Deer Spring Silver'

(deer spring silver sage)

This selection of Cleveland sage is from northern San Diego County. Similar to the popular 'Winnifred Gilman' but it's foliage is more silver. Forms a 4 ft. by 4 ft. aromatic shrub with sweetly fragrant foliage. Rich violet-blue flowers in ball-like clusters top the shrub in summer and attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Plant in sunny areas with good drainage and occasional water. Drought and deer tolerant.
Salvia clevelandii 'Pozo Blue' sage
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Salvia clevelandii 'Pozo Blue'

(sage)

This hybrid of Salvia clevelandii and Salvia leucophylla was selected by Las Pilitas Nursery and is getting very good reviews. It appears to be a good substitute for Cleveland sage tolerating less than perfect soil conditions and colder low temperatures. Growing 3-5 ft tall and wide with gray-green fragrant foliage. Blue-lavender flowers in ball-like clusters top the shrub in late spring through early summer and are highly attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Best in full sun with decent drainage. Drought tolerant once established. Deer resistant.  
Salvia clevelandii 'Whirly Blue' sage
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Salvia clevelandii 'Whirly Blue'

(sage)

Large native sage growing 4 1/2 ft. tall and 6 ft. wide with aromatic gray-green foliage and rich violet flowers. Very large flower whorls and deeper color distinguish it from Salvia ‘Aromas’ and Salvia ‘Allen Chickering’.  Good for dry sunny areas. Deer resistant. Attractive to hummingbirds, bees and butterflies.
Salvia clevelandii 'Winnifred Gilman' fragrant sage
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Salvia clevelandii 'Winnifred Gilman'

(fragrant sage)

Floriferous native shrubby sage prized for its intense violet-blue flowers and sweetly fragrant foliage. ‘Winnifred Gilman’ has a nice compact habit to around 3 ft. tall. Well suited for sunny areas with good drainage and occasional summer water. Deer and drought tolerant; attracts bees and hummingbirds.
Salvia clevelandii x 'Kaleidoscope' sage
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Salvia clevelandii x 'Kaleidoscope'

(sage)

This striking new introduction features rosy-purple flowers in whorls atop dense, grey foliage. ‘Kaleidoscope’ is a nice and compact sage, only reaching to 2 – 3 ft. high and slowly spreading to form a small drift about 4 ft. wide. It is proving to be quite a garden tolerant Salvia and resistant to disease, though we are still evaluating it. Enjoys full sun and occasional to no irrigation once established. Needs decent drainage. An excellent plant for bees and butterflies. This selection was discovered by Terry Loveton in her west Sonoma County garden. Deer resistant.
Salvia coahuilensis 'Purple Ginny' Coahuila sage
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Salvia coahuilensis 'Purple Ginny'

(Coahuila sage)

Graceful perennial hybrid sage to 2 ft. tall and spreading. A liberal bloomer, with vivid deep purple flowers summer and fall. Needs good drainage with moderate to occasional water. Plant in full sun to very light shade. Attracts hummingbirds and bees. Deer resistant.
Salvia darcyi  Galeana sage
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Salvia darcyi

(Galeana sage)

A red flowering sage from high elevation Mexico, with very large flowers from early summer on through fall.  Can reach 3 - 4 ft. high, spreading to form a small colony. Prefers good drainage in full sun to light shade. Moderate water. All sorts of pollinators are attracted to this long blooming perennial and it's a hummingbird favorite. Cut to the ground in early spring.  Deer resistant.
Salvia greggii  autumn sage
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Salvia greggii

(autumn sage)

Highly variable species, this form of Salvia greggii grows to around 4 foot tall. Blooming far longer than just autumn, this sage will flower throughout the summer and fall with bright red flowers on the branch tips. Grows in full sun to light shade (especially in hottest areas) with moderate summer watering. More drought tolerant in coastal areas. Benefits from annual pruning in the spring to shape plants and remove any dead wood. Deer resistant. A hummingbird and bee favorite.

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Salvia greggii 'Coral'

Here’s a winning sage. Grows 3 X 3 ft. with neat, aromatic leaves. The coral-colored blossoms are produced in abundance summer through fall and are pollinator favorites. Plant in full sun with moderate to occasional summer water. Deer and drought tolerant.

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Salvia greggii 'Furman's Red'

(Furman's Red Sage)

Selected in the 1970’s and a Plant Select winner in 2005, this dependable selection persists in the trade for it’s profuse displays of dark-red flowers and cold tolerance. Growing 3 to 4 feet tall and 2 to 3 ft. wide with light-green, aromatic foliage. The magenta blossoms can bloom spring through fall and attract hummingbirds, butterflies and other pollinators. Prefers full sun with decent drainage and is drought tolerant once established. Deer resisitant.    
Salvia greggii 'Mirage Soft Pink' autumn sage
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Salvia greggii 'Mirage Soft Pink'

(autumn sage)

Yet another hybrid sage offering a compact, mounding, growth habit of bright green, aromatic foliage and abundant, long blooming flowers of soft lavender-pink. Growing 12 - 14 inches tall and wide with stand out floral displays from late spring through summer and fall. Plant in full sun to light shade with moderate watering. The long blooming splash of color attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant. Good container plant.  

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Salvia greggii 'Mirage Soft Pink'

Yet another hybrid sage offering a compact, mounding, growth habit of bright green aromatic foliage and abundant, long blooming flowers of soft lavender-pink. Growing 12 - 14 inches tall and wide with stand out floral displays from late spring through summer and fall. Plant in full sun to light shade with moderate watering. The long blooming splash of color attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant. Good container plant.  
Salvia greggii 'Moonlight'
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Salvia greggii 'Moonlight'

A Suncrest Nursery selection, this sage forms a compact shrub of bright green aromatic foliage, 2 ft. tall by 2ft. or more wide. Masses of beautiful creamy-yellow flowers bloom over a long period spring thru fall and blend beautifully with other colors. Easy to grow in full sun to light shade with moderate watering. Pollinator favorite. Deer resistant.  
Salvia greggii 'Puebla Cherry'
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Salvia greggii 'Puebla Cherry'

Free flowering perennial sage growing 18 - 24 inches tall and wide. Summer brings an abundance of two-tone flowers of glowing red with a fuzzy purple upper lip. Good garden performer in full sun to light shade with moderate to occasional water once established. Deer resistant. Pollinator favorite.
Salvia leucophylla 'Amethyst Bluff' purple sage
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Salvia leucophylla 'Amethyst Bluff'

(purple sage)

Selected by Carol Bornstein for its vivid rosy-pink flowers, this willing grower starts out as a low mounding shrub, eventually getting very large, reaching 5 ft. or more tall by 10 ft. or more wide. The fragrant silvery foliage is a lovely foil for the large flower heads on 12 inch stalks. Perfect choice for sunny banks where it can sprawl freely and is excellent for erosion control. Drought tolerant, particularly along the coast, but appreciates an occasional summer watering. A bee and hummingbird favorite. Deer and drought resistant.
Salvia leucophylla 'Figueroa' purple sage
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Salvia leucophylla 'Figueroa'

(purple sage)

A beautiful selection of the native gray sage. Forms a compact shrub 3 - 4 ft. tall and wider. The gorgeous whitish-gray foliage is topped with long stems of lavender-pink flowers in whorls. Good choice for a dry sunny bank where it is heat, drought and deer tolerant. This species attracts bees and hummingbirds.
Salvia leucophylla 'Point Sal' purple sage
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Salvia leucophylla 'Point Sal'

(purple sage)

A compact form of the native gray sage. Grows 2 ft. or so tall by 4 ft. or more wide. Evergreen shrub with beautiful silvery, aromatic foliage and pale lavender-pink flowers in whorls. Useful in dry sunny areas.  Attracts bees and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.
Salvia mellifera  black sage
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Salvia mellifera

(black sage)

California’s most common sage occurring in coastal scrub and chaparral communities from the San Francisco Bay Area south into Baja. Grows 3 - 5 ft. tall and wide with textured, highly aromatic foliage. Flowers in late spring with tight whorls of small whitish to pale lavender blossoms. Flowers are not super showy, but renowned as an excellent source of nectar for bees and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun to light shade where it is tough, drought tolerant and deer resistant. No additional water is required once established.

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Salvia mellifera 'Green Carpet'

(green carpet sage)

Mounding and spreading evergreen shrub growing 2 - 3 ft. tall by 6 ft. wide.  Deep green fragrant foliage with nice medium blue flowers in late spring.  Excellent groundcover for full sun with reasonable drainage.  Little to no summer water once established. An excellent habitat plant providing cover and food for wildlife.  The flowers are magnets for bees and hummingbirds, the seeds are relished by goldfinches and quail. Deer resistant.
Salvia mellifera 'Terra Seca' black sage
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Salvia mellifera 'Terra Seca'

(black sage)

Here is an interesting form of the normally upright, native black sage. 'Terra Seca' grows to about 2 1/2 ft. tall and 5 ft. wide. Perfect for a dry sunny bank where it will cover the ground densely and thickly. It will spill over a wall beautifully. The flowers are pale lavender. Deer and drought resistant. This species attracts bees and hummingbirds.
Salvia microphylla 'Heatwave Blaze' sage
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Salvia microphylla 'Heatwave Blaze'

(sage)

The Salvia ‘Heatwave Series’ are selections from Salvia greggii / microphylla crosses. ‘Heatwave Blaze’ offers displays of dark crimson flowers over a long period from summer into fall. Compact, rounded habit, growing 30 inches tall by 36 inches wide.  Plant in full sun to light shade. Drought tolerant but best with an occasional deep watering during the growing season. Attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.  Deer resistant.    

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Salvia microphylla 'Heatwave Glimmer'

(sage)

Another selection from the Heatwave Series, bred in Australia for compact habit and heat resistance. Growing around 2 ft. tall, this floriferous sage offers creamy-white flowers with a hint of pink. The abundant blossoms are set off by handsome black calyces and appeal to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun to light shade. Drought tolerant but best with occasional deep watering during the growing season. Deer resistant.
Salvia microphylla 'Mesa Azure' mountain sage
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Salvia microphylla 'Mesa Azure'

(mountain sage)

A hybrid of uncertain parentage, offering long blooming flowers on compact plants. Growing 18" - 24" tall and wide with good sized, light purple flowers over a long period, spring through fall. Prefers good drainage in full sun to light shade with moderate to occasional summer water. Attracts a wide array of pollinators and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.  
Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' San Carlos festival sage
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Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival'

(San Carlos festival sage)

Introduced by Yucca Do Nursery of Texas, this sage blooms profusely summer-fall with rich magenta-pink flowers. Handsome textured leaves and nice compact habit to 2 to 2-1/2 ft. tall and wide. Requires good drainage, occasional water and little else. A hummingbird and bee favorite. Deer resistant.
Salvia officinalis 'Robert Grimm' dwarf culinary sage
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Salvia officinalis 'Robert Grimm'

(dwarf culinary sage)

An interesting cultivar of the culinary sage, ‘Robert Grimm’ grows only 8 inches tall and spreading to form a good-sized mat in time to 3 - 4 ft. wide. The silvery evergreen foliage is topped with spikes of beautiful blue flowers in the late spring. Wants good drainage, full sun to light shade with moderate to a little summer water. Deer don’t seem to eat it.

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Salvia pachyphylla

(rose sage)

Native to southern California deserts, this beautiful silvery shrub of intensely aromatic foliage grows 18 - 30 inches tall and wide. Spikes of densely packed whorls with large violet-blue flowers bloom over a long period in summer. This striking sage requires full sun with excellent drainage, where it will be extremely drought tolerant once established. A magnet for pollinators including butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.
Salvia sonomensis  Sonoma sage
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Salvia sonomensis

(Sonoma sage)

Sonoma sage is a wonderful native perennial and can be a serviceable groundcover if its needs are met. Good drainage is a must and it performs best with light shade. Water plants to get established-very drought tolerant, will NOT tolerate regular summer water. Mat forming, flowers rise to about 6 inches above the foliage and are lavender-blue. This species attracts bees and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.

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Salvia sonomensis 'Greenberg Gray'

(Sonoma sage)

We named this wonderful gray-leaved form of the Sonoma sage for Katherine Greenberg who had it growing in her beautiful Lafayette garden. This striking species forms a ground hugging carpet of leaves with charming, blue-purple flowers in late spring on stems up to 6 inches tall. Bees, butterflies and hummingbirds love the blossoms. Needs lightly dappled shade and excellent drainage with little to no water once established. Great under manzanitas. Deer resistant.
Salvia sonomensis 'Hobbit Toes' Sonoma sage
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Salvia sonomensis 'Hobbit Toes'

(Sonoma sage)

An interesting selection of Sonoma sage from the Cuesta Grade in San Luis Obispo County.  A compact grower forming a flat mat of gray leaves covered with soft white hairs. The blue-violet flowers spikes are darker than many of our local forms and make a beautiful display in late spring, a favorite of bees and hummingbirds. This fragrant ground cover tolerates heat and drought and requires good drainage with only occasional to no summer watering once established. Will grow in a variety of exposures but often seems happiest with a bit of light shade. Deer resistant.
Salvia sonomensis 'John Farmar-Bowers' white-flowered Sonoma sage
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Salvia sonomensis 'John Farmar-Bowers'

(white-flowered Sonoma sage)

Thanks to Kent Calkins for sharing this unique form of sonoma sage he found growing on his property in the hills above Santa Rosa. Instead of the usual lavender-blue flowers, this plant has creamy white flowers on 6 inch stalks above the ground hugging mat of aromatic foliage. A wonderful native groundcover which requires good drainage and performs best with light shade. Water plants to get established - very drought tolerant, will NOT tolerate regular summer water. Deer resistant. Attracts bees and hummingbirds.
Salvia spathacea  hummingbird sage
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Salvia spathacea

(hummingbird sage)

A wonderful native sage, endemic to California where it is found at low elevations of the Coast Ranges from San Bruno Mountain in the north to Orange County in the south. Fragrant, fruity foliage spreads by creeping rhizomes to form handsome mats. Flower stems rise 2 - 3 ft. above the leaves carrying many large ball-like clusters of magenta flowers that the hummingbirds adore. Does best in cool sun or part shade in hot areas. Drought tolerant, but looks best with occasional summer water. This species attracts hummingbirds. Deer resistant.
Salvia spathacea 'Avis Keedy' yellow-flowered hummingbird sage
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Salvia spathacea 'Avis Keedy'

(yellow-flowered hummingbird sage)

An interesting yellow-flowered form of the normally magenta flowered hummingbird sage, introduced by the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. Discovered in an oak woodland in Santa Barbara County, this cultivar has unusual lemon yellow petals that fade to creamy white and are backed by lime green bracts. Forms the usual fragrant, spreading mat of large leaves topped with three foot tall flower stalks with distinctive whorls of flowers in the spring. Best with part shade unless directly along the coast and an occasional summer watering to keep it going through the summer. Without summer water will go summer dormant reviving with the rains. A bee and hummingbird favorite. Deer resistant.
Salvia spathacea 'Las Pilitas' hummingbird sage
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Salvia spathacea 'Las Pilitas'

(hummingbird sage)

A very LOW form of the fragrant hummingbird sage, selected and introduced by Las Pilitas Nursery. Ground hugging foliage spreads to form handsome mats 3 - 6 ft. wide. Flower stems rise 18 inches above the foliage with ball-like clusters of magenta flowers which are bee and hummingbird favorites. Best with light shade and occasional summer water. Deer resistant.

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Salvia spathacea 'Powerline Pink'

(hummingbird sage)

This selection of the wonderful native hummingbird sage is notable for its size. It stands 3 ft. tall before it flowers, and its flowering stalks can add another 3 ft. to the height. Fragrant, fruity foliage spreads by creeping rhizomes to form handsome mats. The flower stems carry many large ball-like clusters of magenta flowers that the bees and hummingbirds love. Does best in cool sun or part shade in hot areas. Drought tolerant but looks best with occasional summer water. Deer resistant.
Salvia uliginosa  bog sage
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Salvia uliginosa

(bog sage)

Graceful tall perennial sage 4 ft. tall and spreading widely. Gorgeous azure blue flowers summer-fall. Sun and regular water to look its best. Cut to the ground in winter. Spade back to keep in bounds. Flowers are bee magnets, goldfinches relish the seeds.
Salvia x 'Dara's Choice' sage
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Salvia x 'Dara's Choice'

(sage)

Selected by Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, this native hybrid sage forms a dense, dark green, mounding groundcover 1.5 ft. tall by 3 – 4 ft. wide. The aromatic foliage is topped with wands of soft lavender-blue flowers on small whorls in the late spring to early summer. In hotter climates, light or part shade is preferred, where it will be quite drought tolerant once established. A more refined native sage which combines well with iris, California fuchsia and grasses. Adored by bees and hummingbirds but not eaten by deer. 
Sambucus mexicana (nigra ssp. caerulea)  blue elderberry, Mexican elderberry
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Sambucus mexicana (nigra ssp. caerulea)

(blue elderberry, Mexican elderberry)

Our native blue elderberry often seen on banks above rivers and streams. Fast growing deciduous shrub or small tree 8 to 25 ft. tall. Creamy yellow flowers in flat topped clusters followed by blue berries. High on the birds’ favorite list! Ripe berries feed many species of birds. Moderate summer water.
Sambucus nigra 'Black Beauty' elderberry
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Sambucus nigra 'Black Beauty'

(elderberry)

Sensational new elderberry with deep burgundy, nearly black foliage. Loads of pink flower clusters in early summer contrast beautifully with the awesome deep colored foliage. A striking addition, easily reaching 8 by 8 ft., but is amenable to annual pruning. Plant in sun to light shade with moderate to occasional summer water. Berries attract birds.
Sambucus nigra 'Black Lace' cut-leaf black elderberry
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Sambucus nigra 'Black Lace'

(cut-leaf black elderberry)

Intense purple-black, finely cut foliage adorn this beautiful and easy to grow shrub. Growing 8 ft. by 8 ft. in full sun to light shade with regular to moderate water.  A great landscape shrub, striking specimen, screen or border plant as well as a good container subject. Summer brings soft-pink flowers in flat topped sprays that contrast beautifully with the gorgeous foliage. The clusters of small purple fruits that follow are attractive to birds. Amenable to artistic pruning or annual shearing to keep in scale, best done after bloom so not to lose next years flowers.
Sambucus nigra 'Laciniata' cut leaf elderberry
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Sambucus nigra 'Laciniata'

(cut leaf elderberry)

A beautiful cut leaf elderberry. Graceful, airy and finely dissected deep green foliage. Large flat topped sprays of white flowers become black shiny berries. Will grow easily to 10 ft. or more. Prune to desired height. Plant in sun to light shade with moderate to occasional watering. Flowers enjoyed by pollinators, berries relished by birds.
Sambucus nigra 'Marginata' variegated elderberry
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Sambucus nigra 'Marginata'

(variegated elderberry)

This variegated elderberry is an easy, willing grower, and can really light up the garden. Grows fast to 6 to 12 ft. tall and wide. Creamy white lacy flowers followed by blue-black berries which are attractive to birds. Grows in cool full sun to light shade. Has done well in fairly deep shade too.
Sambucus racemosa  red elderberry
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Sambucus racemosa

(red elderberry)

Red elderberry is native to moist areas along the coast. Shrub or small tree 6 - 18 ft. tall. Bright green foliage and pretty white flowers in pyramidal clusters followed by bright red berries. The fruits are relished by birds but are reputed to be POISONOUS to humans. Cool sun, light shade and moisture. High on the birds’ favorite list! Ripe berries feed many species of birds.
Sambucus racemosa 'Alamere Lavender' red elderberry
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Sambucus racemosa 'Alamere Lavender'

(red elderberry)

Plant description coming soon.
Satureja (Clinopodium) douglasii  yerba buena
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Satureja (Clinopodium) douglasii

(yerba buena)

Wonderfully fragrant native perennial with trailing stems about 6 inches tall and spreading. Roundish, scallop-edged, deliciously minty leaves have a long history of herbal uses. Tiny white flowers are borne in axils of leaves in the spring. A sweet small scale groundcover for the woodland garden with light shade and moderate to a little summer water.
Satureja (Clinopodium) mimuloides  monkeyflower savory
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Satureja (Clinopodium) mimuloides

(monkeyflower savory)

Native to creeksides in the mountains of southern California, this clump forming perennial is rarely seen in cultivation. Growing 2 - 3 ft. tall and wide with soft, fragrant foliage. Orangy-red tubular flowers bloom late spring to early summer and are hummingbird favorites. Plant in sun to light shade with regular moisture.
Scirpus acutus  common tule, giant bulrush
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Scirpus acutus

(common tule, giant bulrush)

Also called giant bulrush, this large bold plant can form massive colonies on the edges of wet areas. Native to freshwater marshes, lakes and stream banks throughout lower elevations in California and much of North America. Vertical, thick, round, leafless stems grow 12 to 15 ft. tall and spread underground. In large landscapes it can be used as a pond or riparian plant where it will form dense thickets. Can be grown in containers for smaller gardens, set just below water level for a dramatic vertical accent. Plant in full sun with regular water. Provides good habitat for wildlife.
Scrophularia californica  beeplant or figwort
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Scrophularia californica

(beeplant or figwort)

Native to open places of the coastal scrub and woodlands where it can form large colonies in moist areas. Grows 2 to 3 1/2 ft. tall and wide in cool full sun to light shade. Pretty purplish-red new growth matures to deep green. The flower spikes carry many small open-mouthed maroon-red flowers followed by attractive seed stalks which are nice in dried flower arrangements. This prolific nectar producer attracts all sorts of pollinators including bees and hummingbirds. Larval food source for the Chalcedon Checkerspot and Common Buckeye butterfly. Birds relish seeds.
Scrophularia californica green-flowered form green-flowered beeplant or figwort
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Scrophularia californica green-flowered form

(green-flowered beeplant or figwort)

An interesting color form of the normally maroon flowered figwort. Seed was collected from a site in northern Santa Cruz county that has wonderful yellow-green flowers. The open-mouthed flowers are small but profuse. Native to open places of the coastal scrub and woodland where it can form large colonies in moist areas. Grows 2 to 3 1/2 ft. tall and wide in cool full sun to light shade. Larval food source for the common checkerspot butterfly.
Scutellaria  'Violet Cloud' skullcap
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Scutellaria 'Violet Cloud'

(skullcap)

Plant description coming soon.
Scutellaria californica  California skullcap
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Scutellaria californica

(California skullcap)

A charming perennial native to gravelly soils of low and mid elevation mountains of Northern California where it grows on the edge of woodlands and chaparral communities. Leaves are arranged oppositely on erect stems less than one foot tall. The very sweet, small, creamy-white snapdragon-like flowers occur in pairs at the leaf axils. Spreads by underground rootstocks to form colonies. In our nutritious water retentive soils has spread quite vigorously, in dryer leaner soils less so. Plant in full sun to light shade. Drought tolerant but would appreciate a little summer water.
Scutellaria suffrutescens  pink Texas skullcap
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Scutellaria suffrutescens

(pink Texas skullcap)

Sturdy, compact, long blooming perennial growing less than 6 inches tall by 15 inches wide. Deep green foliage and dense growth habit make a tidy foil for the profusion of small rosy- pink snapdragon-like flowers over a long period spring-summer. Highly attractive to pollinators and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun to light shade with occasional water.  Drought and heat tolerant. Deer tolerant too.
Sedum  'Gold Thread' sedum
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Sedum 'Gold Thread'

(sedum)

What a gem! Found at a Cactus and Succulent Show and Sale at the Huntington Botanic Garden last year, this bright golden sedum is tiny and charming. So far the plants have remained compact, very slowly spreading, and able to tolerate a wide range of conditions. Has stayed under 2 inches tall and 8 inches wide. Seems to tolerate moisture, and drought tolerant as well. Golden in bright shade, burns in too much sun. Evergreen in winter, hardy so far. Best in well drained soil. A treasure for rock gardens, succulent bowls, in between pavers, en masse on an edge.
Sedum  'Lime Twister' stonecrop
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Sedum 'Lime Twister'

(stonecrop)

From the Sunsparkler Sedum hybrid program, this Sedum offers variegated cream and green foliage, growing 4 – 6 inches tall and 12 – 18 inches wide. The compact mounds spread slowly and are topped with bright pink flowers in late summer. Useful small scale groundcover for the front of the border, rock gardens, or containers. Good drainage and a little shade is best with moderate watering. Bees and butterflies are attracted to its flowers.
Sedum divergens  Pacific stonecrop
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Sedum divergens

(Pacific stonecrop)

This is a little beauty. Mat-forming and evergreen, this succulent is native to California north to Alaska. Tolerant of wet winters, the shiny round bead-like leaves turn a dark red in full sun. Stays compact and slowly spreads, 2 - 4 inches tall, reaching about 18 inches in diameter. Blooms starry yellow flowers in summer. Great in rock gardens, planters, useful as an edge plant. Adapts to many soil types. Fully hardy and drought tolerant once established. We have this planted in our trough in front of the greenhouse.
Sedum hispanicum  blue carpet, Spanish stonecrop
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Sedum hispanicum

(blue carpet, Spanish stonecrop)

A little cutie of a plant! Forming a cushion/mound of blue to blue-gray, tight, tiny, needle-like leaves, this stonecrop is gorgeous in a rock garden, between stepping stones, or in a succulent planter. It spreads very slowly, staying just 2 inches tall and getting about 8 inches wide. Looking the same through the winter (hardy and evergreen), the cold seems to bring out the deeper purple colors. Have not seen it bloom yet - supposedly pinkish white flowers in summer. Needs well-drained soil and sun to part shade to look its best. Let dry between waterings. A fantastic form! Planted in our trough in front of the greenhouse.
Sedum makinoi 'Ogon' Japanese stonecrop
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Sedum makinoi 'Ogon'

(Japanese stonecrop)

This beautiful succulent will brighten up a rock garden, wall, container or any place a small scale, shallow rooted groundcover is needed. The low mat has bright golden yellow flowers in the spring. Needs good drainage, sun to light shade (all but the hottest sun) and moderate water.
Sedum spathulifolium  Pacific stonecrop
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Sedum spathulifolium

(Pacific stonecrop)

A mat forming native succulent often seen on rocky cliffs and shady banks in California’s Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada north to British Columbia. Small, spoon-shaped leaves form flat rosettes where bright yellow star-like flowers appear in late spring and early summer. A natural for the rock garden or container plantings where they are best with part shade. Very drought tolerant.

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Sedum spathulifolium 'Campbell Lake'

(Pacific stonecrop)

Jenny Flemming’s selection from the Salmon Mountains in northwestern California. As chalky white as the Oregon native Sedum ‘Cape Blanco’. Good drainage and some shade inland. Excellent between rocks in unmortared rock retainer walls. Drought tolerant.

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Sedum spathulifolium 'Cape Blanco'

(common stonecrop)

A mat forming, western native succulent, often seen on rocky cliffs and shady banks in California’s Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada north to British Columbia. Small, spoon-shaped leaves form flat rosettes where bright yellow star-like flowers appear in late spring and early summer. The cultivar 'Cape Blanco' was selected along the Oregon coast, for it's chalky-white foliage. A natural for the rock garden or container plantings where they are best with part shade. Very drought tolerant.  
Sedum  spathulifolium 'Elephant Rock' Pacific stonecrop
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Sedum spathulifolium 'Elephant Rock'

(Pacific stonecrop)

This distinctive form of our native stonecrop was discovered on Elephant Rock near Dylan Beach and introduced by Mostly Natives Nursery.Especially large grey-green spoon shaped leaves form luscious mats of flat rosettes.Jewel-like yellow flowers arise in the spring on stalks reaching about 6 inches tall.Excellent small scale ground cover for the well-drained garden in partial shade.Water occasionally once established.Good container subject too.  
Sedum spathulifolium 'Purpureum' Pacific stonecrop
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Sedum spathulifolium 'Purpureum'

(Pacific stonecrop)

This distinctive form of the Pacific stonecrop features purple leaves which turn particularly dark in the winter. Bright yellow flowers are produced in late spring and early summer on short stems up to 4 inches high. This mat forming succulent grows in rocky crevices and shady banks in California’s Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada north to British Columbia. The small, spoon-shaped leaves form flat rosettes. Needs excellent drainage and some shade, especially in the afternoon. A natural for the rock garden or container plantings where its diminutive nature can be appreciated. Very drought tolerant.
Sedum spurium 'John Creech' stonecrop
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Sedum spurium 'John Creech'

(stonecrop)

A durable semi-evergreen, hardy groundcover, suitable for pathways, rock gardens, and as a bank cover. ‘John Creech’ is a particulary low and tight form of S. spurium that grows 2 inches tall and spreads to a foot wide, then slowly creeps in a noninvasive manner. Its dense habit tends to keep weeds from poking through. Topped by purplish-pink flowers in summer that attract butterflies. Plant in well drained soil. Looks best with occasional summer water. Somewhat drought tolerant. Named for Dr. John Creech, of the U.S. National Arboretum, who discovered the plant in Siberia. Supposedly deer resistant.
Sedum telephium 'Autumn Joy' sedum
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Sedum telephium 'Autumn Joy'

(sedum)

Introduced to the U.S. in 1955, this dependable, late flowering, easy to grow perennial will except a wide range of conditions.  Fleshy blue-green leaves with large dusty rose-pink flower heads in summer turn a wonderful rust color with age. Sun, light shade, moderate to little water. About 2 - 2 1/2 ft tall. A bee and butterfly favorite.
Sempervivum  cultivars hen and chicks, houseleeks
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Sempervivum cultivars

(hen and chicks, houseleeks)

Native to the mountains of Europe and very hardy, semps are slowly clumping evergreen succulents for sunny areas with good drainage. Each spring babies (chicks) appear, radiating out from Mamma hen like the spokes of a wheel, that then root and start their own "family". In some cultivars, in mid to late summer, Mamma blooms with star-shaped (usually pink or reddish) flowers then dies, leaving her chicks to carry on. Easy to grow and fairly drought tolerant, they seem to be able to take a considerable amount of moisture. Great in containers. Used in ancient Europe on house roofs to insulate and "protect from lightening". Leaf colors vary according to the seasons, strong light results in more intense colorations. Easy to spread around the yard by breaking off a chick and transplanting to other areas. Long-lived. NOT deer resistant.
Sequoia sempervirens  coast redwood
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Sequoia sempervirens

(coast redwood)

A beautiful and fast growing conifer, famous, as it is the world’s tallest tree. Provides a symmetrical pyramid of soft fragrant foliage 70 to 100 ft. or more tall. Outside its native range it will be shorter, topping out at around 50 ft. The columnar trunks are covered with thick fibrous red-brown bark. Small one inch cones form in clusters at the branch tips. Grows easily in areas with coastal influence and fog but will grow in drier interior sites with regular summer water. Performs well in the regular watering regimes of many urban gardens and lawns. Can be planted as a specimen, in groves, or even pruned as a hedge. As long as its watering requirements are met it has very few pest or disease problems.
Sequoia  sempervirens 'Kelly's Prostrate' Kelly's prostrate coast redwood
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Sequoia sempervirens 'Kelly's Prostrate'

(Kelly's prostrate coast redwood)

A low growing form of the coast redwood with a flat, spreading habit.  Exceptionally low growing, we have never seen any upright growth in this form.  The flat sprays of foliage are deep green with light green new growth and spreading to five foot wide or more.  Best in moist, well drained soils with light shade. Use where the unique form can be shown off.  Makes an excellent container subject.
Sequoia sempervirens 'Nana Pendula' prostrate coast redwood
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Sequoia sempervirens 'Nana Pendula'

(prostrate coast redwood)

An intriguing prostrate form of the coast redwood. Bluish-green leaves on pendulous branches spread out in a circular form usually under 1 ft. tall. May mound up taller over time, trim out any tall leaders that may occur. An interesting specimen or container subject for lightly shaded areas with regular water. Grows much slower than the upright tree form of coast redwood, with the branches achieving a spread of around 6 to 12 ft. in ten years.
Sidalcea calycosa ssp. rhizomata  Point Reyes checkerbloom
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Sidalcea calycosa ssp. rhizomata

(Point Reyes checkerbloom)

Plant description coming soon.
Sidalcea malviflora  checkerbloom
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Sidalcea malviflora

(checkerbloom)

Beautiful spring blooming native perennial found in moist meadows along the coast and inland from Southern Oregon to the Mexican border. Reliable and easy to grow, and an excellent addition to a grasslands or meadow planting. Grow in full sun to partial shade where it thrives with moisture and tolerates moderate to little water once established. With drought will go summer dormant. Light to dark pink, small to large flowered; they are all beautiful. A nectar and larval food source for the West Coast Lady, Painted Lady, Common Checkered Skipper, and the Gray Hairstreak butterflies.
Sidalcea malviflora 'Palustre' checkerbloom
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Sidalcea malviflora 'Palustre'

(checkerbloom)

This selection of our native checkerbloom has particularly large, saturated pink flowers held on stems which spread across the ground. Leathery, dark-green, scalloped leaves form a carpet on this small-scale groundcover. Plant in full sun to light shade and provide moderate irrigation. Butterflies nectar on the flowers and also use checkerbloom as a larval host plant. West Coast lady, painted lady, checkered skipper and gray hairstreak butterflies all depend on this species to support their caterpillars.
Sidalcea malviflora ssp. patula  Siskiyou checkerbloom
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Sidalcea malviflora ssp. patula

(Siskiyou checkerbloom)

Bright, rose-pink flowers line foot long stems on this rare checkermallow from northwest California. Spreading mats of fuzzy, round leaves only a couple of inches tall provide an appealing backdrop for the colorful flowers. Enjoys full sun to part shade. Protect from the hot afternoon sun in inland climates. Provide moderate to occasional irrigation. An excellent plant for bees and butterflies. 
Sidalcea reptans  Sierra checkerbloom
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Sidalcea reptans

(Sierra checkerbloom)

From moist meadows in the Sierra Nevada comes this charming checkerbloom groundcover. In early summer, soft-pink, cup-shaped flowers perch along stems up to 20 inches high. Thick, bright-green leaves with scalloped edges carpet the ground. Plant in full sun to light shade and don’t let them dry out completely. The Sierra checkerbloom is an easy-to-grow mountain species which combines nicely with umbrella plant, rushes and Dunn’s lobelia. Great in a container, too!

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Sidalcea stipularis

(Scadden Flat checkerbloom)

A very rare checkerbloom native to a single marsh in the Sierra foothills.  Round, serrated leaves appear in late winter and spread quickly to form an eight inch tall, light green groundcover.  Soft-pink cup-shaped flowers bloom in early summer atop two foot stems clothed in lance-shaped leaves.  Combine with low grasses in a well-watered meadow for a lovely naturalized look.  Plant in full sun to light shade with moderate to regular water.  Tolerant of heavy soils.  Winter deciduous. 
Silene californica  Indian pink
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Silene californica

(Indian pink)

Native to open woods from Southern California north to Oregon, this native perennial is a knock out in bloom. Late spring and early summer bring brilliant, deeply lobed scarlet petals over the low growing mound of foliage about one foot tall by one foot wide. Best suited for well drained soils in lightly shaded settings where water can be withheld once plants begin to go dormant. A top notch rock garden subject and hummingbird favorite.
Sisyrinchium bellum  blue-eyed grass
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Sisyrinchium bellum

(blue-eyed grass)

A beloved native perennial wildflower with grass-like foliage and six-petaled spring blossoms that range from blue to purple with occasional pure white forms. Grows 6 - 12 inches tall in small clumps where it is useful in meadow or grassland plantings as well as mixed borders. Sun to partial shade, with moderate to infrequent summer water. Goes summer dormant in dry gardens. Does well in heavy soils and often seeds about when happy.
Sisyrinchium bellum 'Arroyo de la Cruz'  blue-eyed grass
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Sisyrinchium bellum 'Arroyo de la Cruz'

(blue-eyed grass)

A common spring wildflower of grasslands and coastal prairies, where cheerful six petaled blossoms top grassy blades. Flower color can range from pure white to deep violet blue, but the cultivar 'Arroyo de la Cruz' has particularly large dark purple flowers and grows 10-12 inches tall. Plant in full sun to partial shade, moderate to infrequent summer water.  Goes summer dormant in dry gardens. Does well in heavy soils. Deer resisitant.        
Sisyrinchium bellum 'Fort Bragg' blue-eyed grass
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Sisyrinchium bellum 'Fort Bragg'

(blue-eyed grass)

This special from of our native blue-eyed grass features pale lavender, almost white petals which darken to deep purple at their base, surrounding a yellow center. Only reaching up to 6 inches high, this little dwarf features narrow, iris-like leaves which form dense little clumps. Blooms most abundantly in spring by can continue to flower into summer if given moderate irrigation. If allowed to go somewhat dry, it may go dormant, only to re-emerge with gusto in winter. Plant in full sun to light shade. An excellent perennial for small spaces and narrow borders. We believe this selection was discovered by Charlie Swehla.
Sisyrinchium bellum 'Rocky Point' dwarf blue-eyed grass
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Sisyrinchium bellum 'Rocky Point'

(dwarf blue-eyed grass)

A vigorous selection of dwarf blue-eyed grass discovered on Rocky Point south of Carmel in Monterey County and introduced by Native Sons Nursery. Robust, rich green clumps of wide, iris-like leaf blades 4 - 6 inches tall feature vibrant blue-purple flowers with yellow centers. A great rock garden item. Plant in full sun to part shade. This spring bloomer will go semi-dormant in summer if allowed to go somewhat dry. With moderate irrigation it will be evergreen and have an extended bloom preiod.
Sisyrinchium bellum 'Sonoma Snow' blue-eyed grass
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Sisyrinchium bellum 'Sonoma Snow'

(blue-eyed grass)

A beloved native perennial wildflower with grass-like foliage and half inch, six-petaled spring blossoms that range from blue to purple with occasional pure white forms. Grows 6 - 12 inches tall in small clumps where it is useful in meadow or grassland plantings as well as mixed borders. Sun to partial shade, with moderate to infrequent summer water. Goes summer dormant in dry gardens. Does well in heavy soils and often seeds about when happy.
Sisyrinchium californicum  yellow-eyed grass
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Sisyrinchium californicum

(yellow-eyed grass)

Native to coastal areas where this perennial thrives in wet areas. The leaves are pale green and the flowers are bright yellow. Grows 6 to 12 inches tall. Plant in sunny areas with regular water. Reseeds readily.
Sisyrinchium sp. - dwarf  blue-eyed grass
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Sisyrinchium sp. - dwarf

(blue-eyed grass)

While we’re a little unsure about this selection’s origins, we do know it’s an AMAZING bloomer and an easy garden plant! In spring and into summer, deep blue-purple flowers with yellow centers cover this very dwarf blue-eyed grass which stays under 6 inches tall. Very narrow, iris-like leaves slowly increase to form a small clump. Plant in full sun to light shade and provide moderate to infrequent irrigation. If allowed to go dry in summer, it will go dormant, only to re-emerge with the winter rains.

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Solanum umbelliferum

(blue witch)

A perennial subshrub from chaparral and oak woodland plant communities, often growing on the edge where they may receive some relief from the full sun. Grows quickly, to as much 3 ft. high with pale green oval leaves on green stems, often sprawling widely. Blooms over a long period with a multitude of blue-purple saucer shaped flowers followed by small tomato-like fruits. Plant in full sun to partial shade with little to no summer water. May go summer deciduous with drought, becoming twiggy and leafless until the rains return. All parts of the plant are poisonous which should make them dependably deer resistant.
Solanum xanti 'Mountain Pride' purple nightshade
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Solanum xanti 'Mountain Pride'

(purple nightshade)

Outstanding selection by Carol Bornstein from the hills surrounding Santa Barbara,following the wildfires of 2008. Chosen for it's particularly dark purple flowers, this subshrub grows 3 ft. tall and 3 ft. or more wide. Clusters of rich purple one inch blossoms with bright yellow stamens bloom over a long period but heaviest in spring. In nature it is often found growing along the borders of coastal scrub,chaparral and woodlands. Plant in full sun along the coast with a little shade inland, where it will be drought tolerant once established. Prune to promote bushy habit. A good container subject. Should be deer resistant as all parts of the plant are poisonous.  
Solanum xanti 'Sugarloaf' chaparral nightshade
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Solanum xanti 'Sugarloaf'

(chaparral nightshade)

This is a lovely low growing form of our native nightshade, reaching a height of 18 inches and spreading to 3 feet or more. Blue-purple flowers with yellow centers cover this plant from spring through summer and are followed by round, green fruits resembling little tomatoes. Great for pollinators. Provide full sun to light shade. An occasional pruning keeps it looking dense and healthy. May lose some of its leaves during late summer. Drought tolerant once established. Nightshades are poisonous so deer should leave them alone.
Solidago californica  western goldenrod
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Solidago californica

(western goldenrod)

A showy and easy to grow late blooming native perennial. Spreads by creeping rootstocks where it can form a good-sized colony. Has spread slowly in our heavy clay soils with minimal water, but has the potential to spread aggressively in lighter soils especially with regular water. Late summer through fall brings slender wand-like flower stalks of golden yellow daisies 2 - 3 ft. tall which are visited by bees, butterflies and other insects. Plant in a sunny area where it is drought tolerant, but some supplemental summer water keeps it blooming longer.
Solidago lepida v. salebrosa  western goldenrod
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Solidago lepida v. salebrosa

(western goldenrod)

Golden-yellow, pyramid shaped inflorescences sit atop stems flanked with bright green leaves on this unusual native goldenrod. This selection is more compact and refined than the California goldenrod, with flower stalks reaching only about 2 feet tall and a spreading habit which is less aggressive. A superb plant to attract all sorts of bees and butterflies when it blooms in late summer and into autumn. Plant in full sun to light shade and water moderately to occasionally. This variety grows throughout western North America but is rare in California, only occurring in the northeast part of the state. 
Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks' rough goldenrod
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Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks'

(rough goldenrod)

This beautiful goldenrod is well worth growing. Clump forming, with a compact habit 3 ft. or so tall. Graceful arching flower stems with hundreds of tiny golden yellow daisies late summer through fall. Best in sun with some water. Good cut flower. Excellent late nectar source for pollinators.
Solidago spathulata  coast goldenrod
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Solidago spathulata

(coast goldenrod)

Native to coastal strand and coastal scrub communities where it forms low mats of spreading bright green foliage. Summer brings flower stems a foot or so tall made up of small bright golden-yellow daisies. Full sun to light shade with some summer water. Tolerates heavy soils. The flowers support native bees, honey bees, beneficial insects and butterflies. It is a larval food source for the northern checkerspot butterfly.
Sphaeralcea ambigua  apricot mallow
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Sphaeralcea ambigua

(apricot mallow)

Native to desert plant communities, apricot mallow is a showy evergreen shrublet growing 2-4 foot tall and wide. Soft-green, woolly, scalloped leaves provide the foil for long wands with an abundance of small hollyhock-like flowers in delicious shades of orange. Plant in full sun with good drainage and occasional summer water. Adaptable, tolerating cold, dry conditions but not heavy wet soils. When happy can bloom for months- trim back flowering stems after bloom for repeat performance. A beautiful addition to the dry sunny garden, ideal for inland gardens. Relatively short lived but grows rapidly and occasionally reseeds.  
Sphenosciadium capitellatum  ranger's buttons
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Sphenosciadium capitellatum

(ranger's buttons)

We are excited to offer this denizen of mountain meadows and forests known for its clusters of white flowers or “buttons” on tall stalks reaching up to 5 feet in height.  Lance-shaped leaves of bright green form upright mounds at the base of the stalks.  Ranger buttons are easily identified by the hairy stems within the inflorescences.  Provide regular water and dappled shade.  This unusual member of the carrot family combines beautifully with ferns, lilies and other forest dwellers.
Spiraea bumalda 'Goldflame'
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Spiraea bumalda 'Goldflame'

Grown primarily for its foliage. Creates a vivid picture in spring. Rich bronzy new leaves expand into yellow, followed by rosy red flower clusters (whole branches make great cuts). Then in autumn the leaves color strong copper, orange and yellow. Grows 3 to 4 ft. tall. Sun to light shade most soils, moderate water. Burns in hot sun areas.
Spiraea bumalda 'Limemound'
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Spiraea bumalda 'Limemound'

Dense little mounding bush with lovely lime-green foliage, tinted russet when young, and vibrant orange-red in fall. Sun to light shade(avoiding the hottest afternoon sun), moist soils, moderate water. Flower heads are mounded discs of pink.
Spiraea densiflora  'Trinity Rose' mountain spiraea
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Spiraea densiflora 'Trinity Rose'

(mountain spiraea)

This cultivar hails from the Trinity Alps in northwestern California.  A neat looking deciduous shrub growing 2-3 foot tall and wide with a compact habit and pretty bluish-green leaves.  Early summer brings flat topped clusters of rosy-pink flowers on the branch tips. Foliage often takes on nice yellow tones in the autumn before losing its leaves. Plant in sun to light shade with regular water. Flowers attract butterflies.
Spiraea douglasii  western spiraea
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Spiraea douglasii

(western spiraea)

Deciduous shrub native to coastal ranges from northern California to British Columbia. Forms broad thickets 3 - 6 ft. tall with bluish-green leaves. Purplish-pink narrow flower clusters decorate the branch tips in summer. Best on well-drained soils with moisture and light shade. Great for a naturalistic planting in a woodland garden or along streams.
Sporobolus airoides  dropseed sacaton
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Sporobolus airoides

(dropseed sacaton)

A robust, warm season bunchgrass, which was common in California’s Central Valley prior to agricultural conversion. This western native is found in the Sierra foothills, South Coast Ranges as well as deserts from eastern Washington to Mexico. Forms a dense bunch of fine textured, grey-green blades, 1 to 3 foot tall and wide. Graceful flowering stems carry airy, pinkish flower heads that produce a pink-hued haze, which age to tan. The abundant seeds are relished by birds, but do not tend to reseed in gardens. Tolerant of many soil types and water regimes. Best with full sun to light shade. This grass will be drought tolerant, but does best with some summer water in dryer inland sites. Leaves turn butter-yellow in autumn prior to winter dormancy. Deer resistant.
Stachys albens  hedgenettle
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Stachys albens

(hedgenettle)

Plant description coming soon.
Staphylea bolanderi  bladdernut
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Staphylea bolanderi

(bladdernut)

Description coming soon.
Stipa (Nassella) cernua  nodding needlegrass
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Stipa (Nassella) cernua

(nodding needlegrass)

A beautiful native grass said to be a more impressive horticultural subject than the tough and useful Stipa pulchra. Forms a tufted bunch of foliage with elegant flower stems to about 2 ft. tall. The panicles of thin, fine, nodding awns have a silky aspect and are purplish at first drying silver. They glimmer when backlit. Prefers full sun (but will tolerate light shade) and well drained soils, but has proven adaptable. Drought tolerant. Often self sows. Deer resistant.
Stipa (Nassella) pulchra  purple needlegrass
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Stipa (Nassella) pulchra

(purple needlegrass)

Purple needlegrass is a major species in California grasslands. An excellent choice for nauralistic settings, native plantings, meadows or dry slopes in full sun. Handsome in mass where its purple awns shimmer. The entire plant turns golden come summer then goes dormant, reviving with the rainy season. Can reseed vigorously. Deer resistant.
Styrax redivivus  snowdrop bush
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Styrax redivivus

(snowdrop bush)

A beautiful but little known California native. Slow to mature but worth the wait. Develops into a graceful multistemed deciduous shrub. Dark green rounded leaves clothe the smooth gray branches. Late spring brings dangling clusters of pure white, waxy, bell-shaped blossoms. Grows 6 to 10 ft. tall for sun to light shade. Drought tolerant. We have observed hummingbirds and pipevine swallowtail butterflies nectaring on styrax blossoms.
Succulent Plants
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Succulent Plants

There are many good sources of information on the web for succulents. Some of our favorite urls are listed here: http://crassulaceae.net/ http://www.sedumphotos.net/main.php http://ucanr.edu/sites/scmg/Top_Plants_Category_Parent/Succulents/ http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/996/ http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1441/ http://sempervivoscope.voila.net/ http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.semperhor... http://www.xericworld.com/forums/home.php http://www.agavaceae.com/agavaceae/agavhome_en.asp http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/199/ http://www.sfsucculent.org/
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus  snowberry
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Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus

(snowberry)

Snowberry is a deciduous, native shrub for dry or moist shade. Reaches about 4 ft. tall and spreading. Clusters of tiny, pinkish, urn-shaped flowers are followed by showy white berries on arching branches. Responds well to shearing. A good choice for under native oaks. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Bartlett Springs' snowberry
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Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Bartlett Springs'

(snowberry)

Snowberry is a deciduous, native shrub for dry or moist shade. Reaches about 4 ft. tall and spreading. Our own selection from Lake County, has particularly large oval leaves on graceful arching branches with exceptionally big fruits. Clusters of tiny, pinkish, urn-shaped flowers are followed by showy white berries on the branch tips. Responds well to shearing. A good choice for under native oaks. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds and bees like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'San Bruno Mountain' snowberry
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Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'San Bruno Mountain'

(snowberry)

This attractive low-growing form of our native snowberry is a Cal Flora Nursery selection from San Bruno Mountain. Its dimensions are about 8 inches tall and spreading. Indeed the spreading nature of this plant is robust & it should be included in areas where that is an asset rather than a liability. The wiry arching branches hold light green rounded leaves & the effect of the new growth is delicate and appealing. Tiny pink urn-shaped flowers decorate the branch tips, followed by small white fruits. Perfect for a lightly shaded bank or the light shade of a tree where it will be very drought tolerant. With total drought it may go summer deciduous but occasional summer water will keep it looking fresh. The flowers attract bees and hummingbirds.              
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Tilden Park' snowberry
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Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Tilden Park'

(snowberry)

Here is a particularly fine selection of the native snowberry, notable for its dependable crop of showy white berries on arching branches. A deciduous shrub, snowberry grows to about 4 ft. tall and spreads to form drifts. A good choice for a shady bank, woodland edge, or under oaks. Appreciates and responds to moisture, but once established will tolerate dry conditions. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.

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Symphoricarpos mollis

(creeping snowberry)

Low growing, spreading groundcover, usually staying around a foot tall by 3-4 foot wide. Rounded blue-green leaves on arching stems makes an excellent low growing thicket which competes well with tree roots. An amenable plant, able to grow in full sun in coastal areas and different depths of shade elsewhere, even fairly deep shade. The tiny, pink, bell shaped flowers are attractive to bees and hummingbirds and the white fruits that follow are eaten by birds. Good for erosion control and does well under oaks. Offers excellent habitat value with it's flowers and fruits and provides cover for ground nesting birds. Drought tolerant once established. Deer often leave it alone.    
Symphoricarpos orbiculatus  coralberry
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Symphoricarpos orbiculatus

(coralberry)

Coralberry is a dense bushy deciduous shrub native to the eastern U.S. Soft downy foliage makes an attractive leaf pattern growing 3 to 4 ft. tall and spreading. Tiny urn-shaped flowers are followed by unusual eye catching purplish-pink berries. Thrives with part shade and moisture, but NOT deep shade.
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