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Abies grandis  grand fir
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Abies grandis

(grand fir)

Grand indeed. Glossy, dark green needles and a symmetrical form make this native fir one of our choicest conifers. Native from coastal Sonoma County, just south of the Russian River, north to British Columbia and east to the Rockies. Grows up to a foot a year and is not suitable for the small garden. Plant in full sun along the coast but protect from hot afternoon sun in the interior. Occasional deep waterings are required when young. Combines well with redwoods and bigleaf maples. Often used as a Christmas tree.
Acer  circinatum  vine maple
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Acer circinatum

(vine maple)

Deciduous shrub or tree 5 to 20 ft. tall, native to moist woods and streambanks in the coastal mountains of northern California to British Columbia. Attractive in all seasons: bare reddish twigs in winter, delicate lobed leaves in spring and summer, and good color in autumn. Wonderful in the woodland setting, under tall conifers where its fall color will stand out. A natural with ferns and other woodland plants that receive dappled to part shade and regular to moderate summer water. Can be espaliered too.
Acer glabrum  sierra maple
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Acer glabrum

(sierra maple)

Plant description coming soon.
Acer  macrophyllum  bigleaf maple
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Acer macrophyllum

(bigleaf maple)

Native to stream banks and moist canyons from Southern Alaska to the foothills of California. A large, round-topped tree with large dark green lobed leaves and smooth silver-gray bark. Fast growing 30 ft or more tall. One of the few native trees to offer good fall color. Sun to partial shade, occasional to regular water. When planting in a sunny location, protect the trunk from sun-scald with a dilute application of white latex paint. Deer resistant.

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Acer negundo

(box elder)

The box elder at maturity features a broad canopy supported by thick branches and a wide, gray trunk. In spring, the silky pink inflorescences hang from the tips of the branches as the leaves begin to emerge. Quickly grows to a height and width of up to 50 ft. Often used as a restoration plant in riparian zones. Full sun to part shade. Enjoys regular moisture. Deer seem to leave it alone once established.
Achillea  'Moonshine' yarrow
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Achillea 'Moonshine'

(yarrow)

Great long blooming yarrow with bright lemon-yellow flowers above mounds of soft silvery leaves. This very attractive foliage makes it a great addition to borders and mixed plantings. Full sun with moderate watering. Deer resistant.

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Achillea filipendulina

(fernleaf yarrow)

Sturdy perennial forming a mat of large fern-like leaves spreading to 3 ft. wide with erect flower stems rising above the foliage 3 ft. tall or more.Flat topped bright golden-yellow flowers on long stems make excellent “cuts” both fresh and dried. Plant in full sun with moderate to little summer water. Yarrows are a good nectar source for bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects. Tough and drought tolerant. Deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'Calistoga' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'Calistoga'

(yarrow)

Featured in California Native Plants for the Garden, this selection of native yarrow is from the rugged Palisades above the Napa Valley. Silver gray foliage is topped with creamy white flowers around 1 ft. tall. Its growth is more restrained than many selections of yarrow. Attractive to pollinators. Best with sun, good drainage, and moderate to little summer water. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'Island Pink' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'Island Pink'

(yarrow)

A color variant of the normally white California native yarrow from Santa Cruz Island. Dark green ferny foliage topped with clusters of bright pink flowers on 18 inch stems over a long period. Sun to partial shade, occasional to moderate water. Good habitat value, providing nectar for bees and butterflies. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'King Range' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'King Range'

(yarrow)

The seed for this selection of our native yarrow was from the aptly named Windy Ridge above the scenic mouth of the Mattole River. The parent plants were very stout with foot tall stems and huge inflorescences of creamy white. It has been very vigorous in cultivation so far. Best with sun, good drainage, and moderate summer water. The foliage is deer resistant.

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Achillea millefolium 'Point Cabrillo'

(yarrow)

A delightful form of our local yarrow with wide clusters of soft pink flowers held on stalks reaching 2 feet high. Large, fern-like leaves of green spread quickly to form broad drifts. Selected from Point Cabrillo on the Mendocino coast. Blooms from spring through autumn. Plant in full sun and water occasionally once established. The foliage is deer resistant.

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Achillea millefolium 'Shell Beach'

(yarrow)

A selection from the Sonoma coast of our native yarrow discovered by Mostly Natives Nursery. The flowers are a clear white on stalks reaching a height of about 1 foot. Similar to the selection ‘Sonoma Coast’ but with slightly smaller flower clusters and subtly grayer leaves. Blooms from spring through fall. Give full sun and water occasionally once established. The foliage is deer resistant.
Achillea millefolium 'Sonoma Coast' yarrow
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Achillea millefolium 'Sonoma Coast'

(yarrow)

This is a local selection from the Sonoma County coast near Salmon Creek. Bright green foliage is topped with white flowers in dense heads on compact stems to around 1 ft. tall. Can bloom over a long period, spring through fall, depending on conditions. Best in sunny areas with some summer water, though it is drought tolerant.  Flowers attract butterflies and other insects. The foliage is deer resistant.

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Achillea millefolium (inland form)

(yarrow)

A vigorous and easy to grow perennial, yarrow grows native throughout California in many plant communities. This crop is grown from seed collected from a hot inland site in Napa County. In this form, flower stems rise 18 inches above the gray ferny foliage bearing white flowers in flat topped clusters. Plant in a sunny location with moderate to a little water. Spreads by rhizomes and can form sizable clumps if happy. A good addition to the habitat garden where the flowers provide nectar for bees and butterflies and the foliage provides winter forage for birds. The foliage is deer resistant.

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Achillea millefolium (Montara Mountain)

(yarrow)

We discovered the parent of this giant seed strain on the lower slopes of Montara Mountain in San Mateo Co.. With broad, white flower clusters reaching up to 4 ft. high, this is the largest yarrow we've encountered. While seedlings can vary, we have high hopes for this new introduction. Give full sun and moderate to infrequent irrigation. Potentially an excellent spreading perennial for a tall meadow. Attracts all sorts of pollinators. The green, fuzzy leaves are usually considered to be deer resistant.  

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Achillea millefolium (Tomales Point seed strain)

(yarrow)

Extremely large leaves up to 10 inches long distinguish this form from most other local yarrow selections. While most yarrow from our coastline have very green leaves, this strain is remarkably gray.  From spring through autumn, large white flower clusters sit upon stalks about 2 feet in height. Water occasionally in areas away from the coast and provide full sun. The foliage is deer resistant.

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Achillea millefolium var. steensii

(Steens Mountain yarrow)

Tucked away in southeastern Oregon is an ancient ridge known as Steens Mountain. From those decaying glacial cirques comes this special little yarrow. Distinctive for it's low,dense green foliage and short flower stalks reaching a height of about 6 inches. The flowers are white with umbels about two inches wide. Blooms from spring through autumn. A useful diminutive yarrow for the rock garden or small space. Doesn’t spread as aggressively as it's lowland kin but forms nice dense mats. Provide full sun and water occasionally once established. Deer resistant.
Achillea tomentosa  woolly yarrow
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Achillea tomentosa

(woolly yarrow)

Native to southern Europe, this species forms a dense, evergreen, spreading mat of fuzzy olive-green leaves. Early summer brings bright golden-yellow flowers in flat topped clusters on 6-8 inch stems.  Best in a well-drained soils in full sun. Moderate to occasional water once established. Excellent rock garden subject, small scale ground cover or edging plant. Good in containers too. Deer resistant and pollinator friendly.
Actaea rubra  baneberry
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Actaea rubra

(baneberry)

Native to moist wooded plant communities throughout the Coast Ranges and the Sierra Nevada. The attractive astilbe-like foliage emerges in the early spring. The tiny white flowers have no petals and are made up of clusters of creamy white stamens. The spikes of vivid, shiny red berries are very showy though poisonous - hence the common name baneberry. A wonderful addition to shady situations with some summer water. Goes dormant in the winter.

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Actaea rubra White fruit form

(baneberry)

Thanks to Matt Teel of Yerba Buena Nursery for sharing seed of the white fruit form of the more commonly seen red fruited baneberry. We are not sure how true these will come from seed and suspect there will be some red berries showing up in this crop. So far we have had only white fruits coming from this seed source, but we will have to see how the entire crop develops. Baneberry is a wonderful woodland plant and easy to grow in shady locales with some summer moisture. The foliage is astilbe-like and late spring brings tall flower stems topped with white flowers that have no real petals and are made up of clusters of creamy white stamens. The showy and VERY POISONOUS fruits follow, hopefully in this case white, but may be shiny red. Dies back to the ground in the winter.
Adenostema fasciculatum v. prostratum  prostrate chamise
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Adenostema fasciculatum v. prostratum

(prostrate chamise)

An interesting form of a rugged native shrub that inhabits hot dry rocky slopes of the chaparral. This rare and unusual form, from Santa Cruz Island grows into a low mound 3 - 4 ft. wide with dark green needle-like leaves. Small creamy white flowers in dense spikes decorate the branch tips in summer. A natural for dry sun drenched slopes where it will require no supplemental water once established. 

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Adenostoma fasciculatum

(chamise)

Chamise is found on the poorest soils in hot, dry, exposed areas of chaparral plant communities.  Bright green needle-like leaves cover this evergreen shrub.  Late spring brings showy plumes of creamy white flowers in small dense sprays, persisting as they age to reddish brown. This tough shrub can grow 3-10 ft tall and wide depending on conditions. An excellent erosion control plant for tough sites where it holds soil, provides cover for wildlife and acts as a nurse plant, paving the way for the other species to get started.  Plant in full sun with no water required once established. Deer resistant.
Adiantum aleuticum  five-finger fern
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Adiantum aleuticum

(five-finger fern)

Five finger fern provides a delicate, airy, fresh effect in the shade garden. Easy to grow with regular water and humusy soil. Does well in containers too. Fronds form finger-like patterns on handsome black stems up to 1 and 1/2 feet tall.  Somewhat winter deciduous.  Combine with wild ginger, redwood sorrel, leopard lilies and sword fern for a handsome woodland garden. 
Adiantum capillus-veneris  southern maidenhair fern
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Adiantum capillus-veneris

(southern maidenhair fern)

A lacy and delicate looking fern with arching dark stems that carry bright green fan-shaped leaflets. A wonderful addition to a woodland garden or any shady space where it is easy to grow as long as it receives regular water. Lovely in containers or raised beds, on a shady bank or border, along the north side of a building. Can grow as much as 1 1/2 ft. tall and wide. Southern maidenhair can be grown through much of California except for high mountain areas. Goes winter dormant with cold.
Adiantum x tracyi  Tracy's maidenhair fern
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Adiantum x tracyi

(Tracy's maidenhair fern)

A naturally occurring cross between Western five finger and California maidenhair fern. Offers a delicate lacy effect with gorgeous bright green fronds on black arching stems. One of the parents is winter dormant, the other, summer dormant, with the resulting hybrid being evergreen. Easy to grow with shade, woodsy soil and summer irrigation. Excellent container plant too.

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