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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Point Reyes' Point Reyes bearberry
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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Point Reyes'

(Point Reyes bearberry)

  An unusual selection of our native bearberry discovered near the Point Reyes lighthouse in Marin County.  Dark green, leathery leaves form distinctive whorls along the stems with pale pink, urn-shaped flowers emerging in early winter. The showy red berries  contrast nicely with the dark green leaves.  Reaching a height of about l8” and a width approaching 6 ft., this groundcover works well in a rock garden or mixed with other low shrubs and grasses from our coastal areas.  Give moderate water in interior locations and protect from the hot afternoon sun.  
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Radiant' bearberry
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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Radiant'

(bearberry)

A very low mat of glossy, dark green foliage 6 - 8 inches high and creeping 4 - 6 ft. across. Light pink flowers in early winter are followed by showy red berries. In hot inland areas give moderate water and light afternoon shade. A sturdy evergreen groundcover.

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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Samoa Dunes'

(bearberry)

This Humboldt County selection of the ubiquitous bearberry distinguishes itself with large, rounded, glossy leaves of deep green. Reaching a height of about 6 inches and a width of at least 6 feet, this durable groundcover spreads quickly to form a weed-smothering carpet. Little urn-shaped flowers colored soft pink appear in spring and are followed by shiny red berries. Provide full sun to part shade and moderate to occasional irrigation once established. Protect from the hot afternoon sun in warmer areas. The shiny, dark green foliage combines well with grey-leaved plants such as Artemisia ‘David’s Choice’ and the fescue ‘Patrick’s Point’. 

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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'San Bruno Mountain'

(bearberry)

A beautiful selection of bearberry from San Bruno Mountain south of San Francisco. This groundcover manzanita forms a luxuriant mat of large, glossy, spatulate leaves spreading to around 6 feet wide. The soft pink urn-shaped flowers lead to big red showy berries.  A natural for coastal plantings where it can grow in full sun with little to no summer water needed. Inland, bearberry does best with shade from the hot afternoon sun and moderate summer watering.
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Wood's Compact' bearberry
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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Wood's Compact'

(bearberry)

A low growing, spreading manzanita with lustrous green, rounded foliage, little pink urn-shaped flowers and pretty red berries, quite large for the species. This selection from coastal Oregon spreads at a moderate pace to 6-8 feet wide and only getting 6-8 inches tall. Full sun to light shade in hot areas with moderate summer water.
Arctostaphylos virgata  Marin manzanita
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Arctostaphylos virgata

(Marin manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos viscida  whiteleaf manzanita
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Arctostaphylos viscida

(whiteleaf manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos x media 'Bokeya Pomo' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos x media 'Bokeya Pomo'

(manzanita)

From the rugged Mendocino coast comes this distinctive manzanita groundcover. Similar to the selection ‘Peter Ehrlich’ with its large, rounded, grey-green leaves but with a slightly more upright, sculptural form which is not quite as dense. Even though it will reach a width of at least 6 ft. over time and height of 2ft., it may take several years to do so.  Urn-shaped white flowers appear in the winter and are followed by round, green fruits in the spring.  Provide full sun to light shade and moderate to occasional irrigation once established.  Should be fairly drought tolerant once established.

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Arctostaphylos x media 'Humboldt Mystery'

(manzanita)

Arching branches and a mounding habit up to 5 ft. tall and 6 ft. wide distinguish this manzanita from its relatives. In winter, pinkish-white flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds and bees, followed by large, red berries in the autumn. Burnished red trunks display a colorful backdrop to the leathery, large, dark green leaves. Plant in full sun to light shade and provide moderate to infrequent irrigation. James Roof of Tilden Botanic Garden discovered this unusual selection somewhere on the Humboldt Coast, but, true to his enigmatic character, refused to say where he found it. It is believed to be a natural cross between bearberry and the hairy manzanita.
Arctostaphylos x media 'Peter Ehrlich' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos x media 'Peter Ehrlich'

(manzanita)

This unusual manzanita from the southern Mendocino coast features what may be the largest leaves of any of the groundcover manzanitas. The round, grey-green foliage mounds densely over time to reach a height of about 3 ft. and a width of up to 8 ft. Clusters of white flowers gather at branch tips in winter, followed by little apple-like fruits in the spring.  While fairly adaptable in the garden, decent drainage is best and full sun to light shade.  Accepting of moderate irrigation but will become quite drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos x media - Point Arena forms  manzanita
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Arctostaphylos x media - Point Arena forms

(manzanita)

This special and diverse group of manzanitas come from Point Arena on the southern Mendocino Coast. These naturally occurring hybrids involve at least two species: A. uva-ursi, A. columbiana and sometimes A. nummularia. The resulting offspring have wonderfully varying features. The leaves range from large, light-green, and fuzzy to small, dark-green and glossy. The plants can form a mounding habit reaching up to 4 feet tall or hug the ground to form dense mats. Plant in full sun to light shade and give moderate to infrequent irrigation once established. Plants grown in hot areas will benefit from extra irrigation and some afternoon shade.

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Arctostaphylos x media - Tilden form

(manzanita)

This big-leaved selection was discovered at Point Arena on the southern Mendocino coast by Steve Edwards of Tilden Botanic Garden. Distinctive for its large, hairy, apple-green leaves and low, dense form only reaching up to about a foot in height and at least 6 ft. in width. Clusters of white flowers appear in spring followed by round, bright green fruits. Plant in full sun to light shade and provide moderate to occasional irrigation once established. Should be quite drought tolerant once established.
Aristolochia californica  Dutchman's pipe vine
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Aristolochia californica

(Dutchman's pipe vine)

Dutchman’s pipe vine is an interesting vine native to river, stream side and woodland habitats. Soft heart-shaped leaves and unusual purplish pipe-shaped flowers bloom in early spring. This deciduous twining plant will need some support if you wish it to grow upwards. Adaptable, but best with a little shade and moderate water. Slow to establish, we offer this adage to encourage patience: “The first year it sleeps, the second year it creeps and the third year it leaps”. Once established it will put on ample growth, easily covering a trellis or chain link fence. THE larval food source for the pipevine swallowtail butterfly. Deer resistant.
Armeria maritima ssp. californica  sea thrift
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Armeria maritima ssp. californica

(sea thrift)

Grown from northern California seed source, this coastal native is a sturdy perennial with grass-like blades in compact clumps. Pink pompom flowers on long stems bloom spring into summer. A natural along the coast where it grows in full sun, needing a little shade in hotter regions. Moderate to little water with decent drainage.  Excellent for rock gardens. Deer resistant.
Artemisia californica  California sagebrush
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Artemisia californica

(California sagebrush)

Native to coastal regions from Northern California to Baja. Densely branched shrub with finely divided gray-green scented foliage. Grows 2 - 4 ft. tall and wide. Light pruning or pinching help keep it dense. Grown for its wonderful texture and foliage color, flowers are inconspicuous. Requires decent drainage and full sun. Thrives in coastal environments, but has performed well inland, especially on slopes where cold air and winter wet drains away. Drought and deer tolerant.
Artemisia californica 'Canyon Gray' prostrate California sagebrush
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Artemisia californica 'Canyon Gray'

(prostrate California sagebrush)

An unusual prostrate form of our coastal native sagebrush, forming a loose, nearly flat mat of finely cut, silvery, fragrant foliage around 4 ft. wide. Useful as a bank cover or for the top of a retaining wall where it can cascade over the edge. Combines beatifully with ceanothus, buckwheats and iris. Should be cut back from time to time to keep dense. Enjoys full sun to light shade and is very drought tolerant once established. Deer resistant.
Artemisia californica 'Montara' California sagebrush
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Artemisia californica 'Montara'

(California sagebrush)

Selected by Roger Raiche at Montara Ridge in San Mateo County. Forms a mound of finely cut fragrant foliage to around 2 ft. tall by 3 ft. (or more) wide. Requires full sun with decent drainage and is drought tolerant once established. Occasional summer water helps retain fresh look. Thrives in coastal environments. Deer resistant.

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Artemisia douglasiana

(mugwort)

Mugwort is native to many plant communities where there is at least some year round moisture: streams and riverbanks, road cuts, ditches, and moist meadows. A stout, rhizomatous perennial with aromatic foliage that is green on top and silvery beneath. The flowers are small and not particularly showy. The foliage is beautiful and fragrant with a long history of medicinal uses. Plant in sun to light shade where it will grow 3 ft. tall and spreading to form a colony. Well watered plants can grow even taller. Provides excellent cover and seeds for birds. Deer resistant.
Artemisia pycnocephala  sandhill sage
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Artemisia pycnocephala

(sandhill sage)

Plant description coming soon.
Artemisia pycnocephala 'David's Choice' sandhill sage
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Artemisia pycnocephala 'David's Choice'

(sandhill sage)

An exceptionally fine selection of a coastal native. Forms a dense silky mound of silvery foliage 4 - 6 inches tall and up to 2 ft. wide. The floppy flowering stems rise a foot above the foliage and are interesting but not real showy. Shear back for longer life. Sun and drought tolerant. Deer resistant.
Artemisia pycnocephala 'Dr. Seuss' sandhill sage
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Artemisia pycnocephala 'Dr. Seuss'

(sandhill sage)

In deference to this selection’s whimsical form, we have named it in honor of the children’s author who truly embodies “whimsical”. Soft, silvery, ferny foliage slowly spreads across the ground on woody branches with unusually tall flower stalks reaching up to 3 feet in height. As the stalks arise, the base is thickly covered in the showy foliage, getting narrower as it approaches the flower buds, giving the plant its unusual form. The small flowers are pale yellow and open in late spring and into summer. Provide good drainage and plant in full sun to light shade. Deer resistant.
Artemisia suksdorfii  coastal mugwort
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Artemisia suksdorfii

(coastal mugwort)

Rhizomatous perennial with sturdy upright stems of whitish-gray felted foliage. Native to coastal California where it grows in seasonal drainages near the ocean. Growing 1 1/2 ft. to 3 ft. tall and spreading to form small colonies of beautiful wooly foliage with a pleasant sage scent. The tiny flowers are not particularly showy but are attractive to pollinators. Useful in informal gardens for sunny areas with some summer moisture. Probably best in areas with some coastal influence. Cut to the ground annually to freshen and make room for new spring growth. Deer resistant.
Aruncus dioicus  goat's beard
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Aruncus dioicus

(goat's beard)

Native to stream sides and moist woods from Mendocino County, California north to Alaska.  A bold and showy perennial looking like a giant astilbe. Forms dense clumps of finely divided foliage with arching, feathery plumes of white flowers 3-5 ft. tall in summer. Requires regular moisture and part shade where it makes a striking specimen or accent plant in the woodland garden. Dies back to its roots in winter. The frothy flower plumes attract an array of tiny little pollinators and the seed heads on female plants are an important food source for birds. Said to be deer resistant.
Asarum caudatum  wild ginger
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Asarum caudatum

(wild ginger)

Native to the deep shade of forest floors, this evergreen perennial forms a handsome low groundcover. Deep green, heart shaped leaves hide the unusual flowers which are maroon with long spidery tails. The ginger scented leaves are deer resistant. For shade with moisture.
Asarum caudatum 'Alba' white-flowered wild ginger
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Asarum caudatum 'Alba'

(white-flowered wild ginger)

An interesting form of the native, shade loving wild ginger. Calling the flowers white is a stretch, they are more of a wasabi-green rather than the usual maroon color of the species. The intriguing long tailed flowers are hidden beneath the glossy heart shaped leaves and would need to be planted on a wall, slope or container to make them easier to view. Wild ginger prefers shade and moisture where it will form a low spreading groundcover.

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