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Iris douglasiana  Douglas iris
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Iris douglasiana

(Douglas iris)

Native to the California coast from Santa Barbara to Oregon. Grows both on the edge of coastal forests and on bluffs and prairies along the ocean. Clumps of evergreen, sword-shaped leaves increase readily and are topped with violet-purple blossoms early to mid spring. Important nectar producer for native bees. An adaptable garden subject for cool full sun to light shade. Drought tolerant once established, but occasional summer water will help keep foliage fresher. Deer resistant.
Iris douglasiana 'Canyon Snow' white Douglas iris
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Iris douglasiana 'Canyon Snow'

(white Douglas iris)

A dependable and floriferous selection of the native Douglas iris, with springtime flowers that are pure white with yellow markings on the falls. Broad shiny blades are mostly evergreen and grow a foot or more tall and form compact clumps. Plant in sun to part shade, particularly in hot inland areas, with moderate to little summer water. Prefers good drainage but will grow well on clay soils provided they are mounded up. Too much summer water on heavy soils will prove fatal. Deer resistant.
Iris douglasiana 'Marin Mauve' iris
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Iris douglasiana 'Marin Mauve'

(iris)

Plant description coming soon.
Iris douglasiana 'Pt. Reyes' iris
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Iris douglasiana 'Pt. Reyes'

(iris)

This is the classic iris seen along our coastline. A vigorous form with compact dark green leaves and a profusion of dark purple flowers, spreading to form large clumps. Beautiful when grown in a meadow of native grasses and coastal wildflowers. Prefers light shade in warmer areas and occasional water for it to look it's best. Pruning the leaves down to the ground in the Fall can help the plant maintain a fresh appearance. Deer tolerant.  
Iris fernaldii  long tube iris
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Iris fernaldii

(long tube iris)

Plant description coming soon.

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Iris innominata

(Del Norte County iris)

A choice iris with slender, glossy, dark-green leaves and dainty flowers in late spring. Flower color can be from brilliant yellows to shades of purple. Native to the Siskiyou Mountains in Del Norte County, California, into southern Oregon where it forms low, dense, evergreen clumps in openings of woodlands or coniferous forests. This species does better in hot, inland areas than the Douglas iris. Requires good drainage and some summer water. This Del Norte County iris has been used in hybridization programs to produce the popular Pacific Coast Hybrid Iris. Deer resistant.
Iris longipetala  iris
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Iris longipetala

(iris)

Restricted to swales and moist areas in coastal grasslands from San Francisco to Monterey, this uncommon native is well worth growing. Bluish-green evergreen blades form erect clumps one foot to 20 inches tall. Early spring brings beautiful lavender-blue flowers with dark purple venation. Full sun in coastal areas, a little shade inland with regular water through the bloom period. Can go dryer once flowering is finished. Deer resistant.
Iris macrosiphon  long tube iris
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Iris macrosiphon

(long tube iris)

A widespread and variable species growing throughout Northern California’s coast ranges and Sierra Nevada foothills. Our crop is grown from seed collected in western Sonoma County which has lovely lavender-blue blossoms April through May. Forms small clumps of narrow and slightly arching blades under 18 inches tall. Often found on wooded slopes, in openings or edges of forests where it will form small patches. Prefers good drainage, drought tolerant, or just a little summer moisture. Deer resistant.
Iris  macrosiphon 'Mount Madonna' long tube Iris
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Iris macrosiphon 'Mount Madonna'

(long tube Iris)

A charming little Iris discovered by Wintergreen Nursery on Mt. Madonna on our central coast. In spring, lavender flowers with deep purple veination and a splash of yellow sit atop dense, fan-like clusters of narrow, blue-green leaves. Reaches a height of about 10 inches and spreads slowly to form little clumps. Provide bright, filtered shade and low to no water once established. Will tolerate full sun in cooler areas. An excellent Iris for a rock garden which attracts bees and butterflies. Deer resistant.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid  Pacific Coast hybrid iris
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Iris Pacific Coast hybrid

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Canyon Sunshine' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
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Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Canyon Sunshine'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Dark Delight' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
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Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Dark Delight'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Madonna Three' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
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Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Madonna Three'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Sebastopol' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
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Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Sebastopol'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Violeta' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
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Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Violeta'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Isomeris (Peritoma) arborea  bladderpod
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Isomeris (Peritoma) arborea

(bladderpod)

This distinctive small shrub from Southern California features clusters of golden-yellow flowers with long stamens, giving them a delicate, airy quality. The flowers are followed by papery, lantern-like seed pods which can become almost translucent with age. While this species blooms strongest in the spring, flowers can be seen year-round. Bladderpod has a loose, rounded habit, reaching 4 to 6 ft. tall and wide. If your plant becomes too lanky, simply cut it to the ground to rejuvenate it. Plant in full sun with good drainage and provide infrequent to zero irrigation once established. A great nectar source for hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. Deer resistant. 
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