Our Plants

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Z

Pages

Carex serratodens  two tooth sedge
More information »

Carex serratodens

(two tooth sedge)

From serpentine meadows comes this lush, blue-green sedge. Our form grows 1 - 2 ft. tall and spreads at a moderate pace, creating broad drifts over time. Needs moderate to regular moisture and full sun to part shade. Often goes semi-dormant in winter at which time the plants can be cut back to just a few inches. A useful sedge for gardens on serpentine or for bank stabilization where it can provide cover for tree frogs and other critters. Does not require serpentine soils to thrive. Deer resistant.
Carex spissa  San Diego sedge
More information »

Carex spissa

(San Diego sedge)

Native to watercourses in coastal sage scrub, chaparral and oak woodlands from San Luis Obispo County to San Diego County. Has proven adaptable and easy to grow here. Wide silvery blades 3 - 4 ft. tall with brown nodding flowers. Sun to light shade. Regular to moderate water. Deer resistant.
Carex testacea  orange-leaved sedge
More information »

Carex testacea

(orange-leaved sedge)

Clumping, fine textured, evergreen-this intriguing sedge has olive green blades that turn intense orange as it matures. Grows 1 1/2 - 2 ft. tall, gracefully arching in long, flowing strands. Wants well drained, moist soil. Full sun, except in hottest areas. Great container plant too. Deer resistant.
Carex tumulicola  foothill sedge
More information »

Carex tumulicola

(foothill sedge)

This is the TRUE Carex tumulicola, the foothill sedge, not to be confused with the so called Berkeley sedge which is correctly identified as Carex divulsa and is non-native AND invasive.  Foothill sedge has a wide distribution in California and north to Washington.  A tough and adaptable tufted evergreen growing 12 inches (or more) tall and spreading slowly by underground rootstocks. Useful as an informal groundcover under shrubs or trees, for a meadow planting or for soil stabilization where the spreading roots help control erosion.  Best with some shade unless right along the coast.  Responds to water but is able to tolerate periods of dryness.
Carpenteria californica 'Elizabeth' California bush anemone
More information »

Carpenteria californica 'Elizabeth'

(California bush anemone)

A beautiful native evergreen shrub 5 - 7 ft. tall and 3 ft. or so wide. Blooms May-July with sweetly scented, pure white, yellow-stamened, camellia-like single flowers. This cultivar is very free flowering with smaller than usual (2 inch) flowers in masses of up to 20 in each of the terminal clusters. Said to be more disease resistant. Best with light shade or morning sun. Drought tolerant, but appearance is improved with some summer water. Does want good drainage. Deer resistant.

More information »

Caryopteris incana

(bluebeard)

An excellent late flowering shrub with aromatic foliage and rich violet-blue flowers in summer. Deciduous, growing 3 - 4 foot tall and wide, with a dense mounding form. Dead heading old flowers often extends bloom period well into autumn. Requires good drainage and full sun with moderate water, though somewhat drought tolerant once established. An excellent source of nectar for late season native bees and honeybees. Treat like a shrubby perennial and prune hard once a year in late winter or early spring.  
Ceanothus  'Antonette' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Antonette'

(California lilac)

An exciting introduction by Native Sons Nursery which was discovered in their landscape. ‘Antonette’ is believed to be a cross between Ceanothus arboreus and Ceanothus ‘Cynthia Postan’ with unusual elongated leaves which remind us of a rockrose. Grows 8 – 10 feet tall and 6 – 8 feet wide with spectacular displays of frosted, violet-blue flowers in early spring. Before they fully emerge, the flower buds display a pleasing rosy color. Plant in full sun with occasional to little summer water once established. Valuable habitat plant, providing food and cover for birds, bees and butterflies.

More information »

Ceanothus 'Berkeley Skies'

(California lilac)

A seedling selection from the Botanic Garden at UC Berkeley, thought to be a cross between Ceanothus megacarpus and Ceanothus gloriosus. Forms an upright shrub 8-15 ft. tall with small leathery leaves and stiff arching habit.  The eye-catching flowers are soft lilac in color with a deep purple center eye to each flower.  It comes into bloom quite early, often beginning in late January and February where they are much adored by bees in search of nectar. Ceanothus require decent drainage, full sun and are drought tolerant once established.
Ceanothus  'Blue Jeans' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Blue Jeans'

(California lilac)

Not the color of denim exactly, the profuse springtime blossoms of 'Blue Jeans' are a rich lavender-purple. Erect evergreen shrub 6 ft. tall and wide with small shiny green leaves. Vigorous and fast growing. Best in full sun with little to no water once established. Tolerates heavy soils. Shrubby Ceanothus provide seeds eaten by bushtits, mockingbirds, quail and finches, as well as cover for birds.

More information »

Ceanothus 'Blue Ray'

(California lilac)

  A Suncrest Nursery introduction, this is a cross between two popular cultivars, Ceanothus 'Ray Hartman' and Ceanothus 'Dark Star'.  Grows 10 feet tall by 15 ft. wide with deep green textured leaves on sturdy stems forming a large mound. Deep vivid blue flowers in dense clusters cover the shrub in spring. Plant in full sun with occasional to no summer water once established. Ceanothus, when in flower, are highly attractive to pollinators of all sorts.  
Ceanothus  'Celestial Blue' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Celestial Blue'

(California lilac)

A beautiful hybrid California lilac selected and introduced by Las Pilitas Nursery. Luminous, rich blue flowers, in tight, conical clusters put on a massive display in spring with the added bonus of sporadic blooming through summer and into fall. Growing 6-8 ft. tall and wide with a mounding habit. Useful as an accent, informal hedge or screen shrub where it grows in full sun to light shade with little to no water once established. Ceanothus are an excellent addition to the habitat garden attracting a myriad of insects and birds.
Ceanothus  'Centennial' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Centennial'

(California lilac)

This low growing Ceanothus has bright, cobalt-blue flowers and small dark-green, shiny leaves. Spreads quickly to around one foot tall by 6 - 8 feet wide.  The flowers are displayed in profusions of small pom-poms colored an intense deep-blue set above small glossy foliage. Drought tolerant but will tolerate moderate irrigation in faster draining soils. More shade tolerant than many Ceanothus but will take full sun except in hot, inland areas. Selected by Roger Raiche at Horseshoe Cove, Sonoma County. 
Ceanothus  'Concha' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Concha'

(California lilac)

An adaptable shrub growing 6 ft. tall and wide, with a dazzling display of glowing purple-blue flowers in the spring. The gracefully arching branches carry dark green shiny leaves and are tolerant of light pruning. Thrives in full sun with little or no water once established. More tolerant of heavy soils and summer watering than most ceanothus. Shrubby Ceanothus provide seeds eaten by bushtits, mockingbirds, quail and finches, as well as cover for birds.
Ceanothus  'Coronado' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Coronado'

(California lilac)

Phil van Soelen selected this striking natural hybrid from along the Sonoma Coast. It was named for the late David Coronado, our dear friend and a talented plantsmen. Compact habit growing to around 2 ft. tall and 6 ft. wide with dark green, deeply veined, toothed leaves. Frosty blue buds open to luminous deep blue blossoms in early spring. Perhaps best in somewhat cooler climates where it performs beautifully in full sun with moderate to no water once established. Ceanothus are excellent habitat plants providing cover and food for wildlife. The early flowers provide nectar for pollinators and seeds for birds. The myriad of insects attracted to the flowers are an added attraction to birds.
Ceanothus  'Dark Star' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Dark Star'

(California lilac)

This popular small leaved shrub reaches 4 - 6 ft. high by 6 - 10 ft. wide. The electric cobalt-blue flowers cover the plant in spring and are very popular with bees and butterflies. Plant in full sun and provide decent drainage. Not a good choice for hot, inland areas. Drought tolerant. 'Dark Star' is VERY similar to 'Julia Phelps' but differs mainly in size. 'Dark Star' tends to stay a little smaller. Shrubby Ceanothus provide seeds eaten by bushtits, mockingbirds, quail and finches, as well as cover for birds.
Ceanothus  'Frosty Blue' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Frosty Blue'

(California lilac)

  A Rancho Santa Ana introduction from the mid 1970's. This upright evergreen shrub reaches 8 to 12 feet tall and 10 to 15 feet wide with glossy green, textured foliage.  Flowers in late spring with 2-4 inch panicles of beautiful blue flowers with a frosted appearance due to the white bracts on the buds.  Useful as a specimen or screen due to it's rapid growth. Amenable to pruning and can be trained into a small tree or espaliered subject. This reliable cultivar tolerates heavy soils better than most upright Ceanothus. Does best in full sun and will be drought tolerant once established. California lilac are valuable additions to the habitat garden. 

More information »

Ceanothus 'Joan Mirov'

(California lilac)

A naturally occurring hybrid from the Sonoma Coast selected by Roger Raiche and introduced by the U.C. Berkeley Botanic Garden. Low spreading habit with a dense form grows 4 ft. tall spreading widely 6-10 ft. or more. The small dark green shiny leaves are topped with an abundance of dark pink buds opening to cobalt blue flower clusters in the spring.  An excellent bank cover where a dense ground covering shrub is needed on a sunny dry site.  When planted inland a little afternoon shade and some summer irrigation is best. Ceanothus are valuable habitat plants where they offer food and cover and excellent forage for pollinators.
Ceanothus  'Joyce Coulter' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Joyce Coulter'

(California lilac)

A very useful medium sized mounding evergreen groundcover discovered in 1956 by John Coulter. Grows 3 - 5 ft. tall and spreads 12 ft. or more wide. Medium-blue flowers cover this shrub in spring. Tolerates garden conditions better than most Ceanothus. Responds well to shearing and can easily be kept to a more compact size. Plant in full sun where it is drought tolerant but best with some summer water in hot interior sites. Shrubby ceanothus provide seeds eaten by bushtits, mockingbirds, quail and finches, as well as cover for birds.
Ceanothus  'Julia Phelps' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Julia Phelps'

(California lilac)

This much admired hybrid Ceanothus features a compact and bushy form, about 6 to 8 ft. tall and 8 ft. wide. Spectacular in spring when glowing dark indigo flowers cover the plant, accented by reddish buds. Small and crinkled dark green leaves provide an excellent backdrop for the richly colored flowers. Plant in full sun. Needs good drainage and summer drought once established. Does not do well in hot, interior climates. Very hard to distinguish from 'Dark Star', 'Julia Phelps' is somewhat larger. Shrubby Ceanothus provide seeds eaten by bushtits, mockingbirds, quail and finches, as well as cover for birds.
Ceanothus  'Ray Hartman' California lilac
More information »

Ceanothus 'Ray Hartman'

(California lilac)

Beautiful large shrub rapidly grows 12 - 20 ft. tall and wide. Dark, shiny green foliage with large, medium blue spike-like flower clusters in the spring. Tolerates pruning and can be trained as a small tree or sheered to create a tall hedge. This selection is especially adaptable, tolerating heat, some summer water and drought. Plant in sun or very light shade. 'Ray Hartman' is a cross between the species C. arboreus and C. thyrsiflorus var. griseus. Ceanothus provide habitat and forage for a wide variety of birds.
Ceanothus arboreus 'Cliff Schmidt' island ceanothus
More information »

Ceanothus arboreus 'Cliff Schmidt'

(island ceanothus)

Selected from Santa Cruz Island by Native Son's Nursery, this handsome cultivar has a strong upright habit, growing into a tall and spreading shrub as much as 15-20 ft. tall and wide. Large dark green glossy leaves have white felted undersides. Medium blue flower spikes blossom in late winter to early spring and often again in fall. Excellent for coastal gardens in full sun, give some afternoon shade and a little summer water in warmer inland sites. This large shrub can be pruned into a lovely small tree. Ceanothus are excellent additions to habitat gardens where they provide food, cover and nesting sites for birds and beneficial insects.  
Ceanothus confusus  Rincon Ridge ceanothus
More information »

Ceanothus confusus

(Rincon Ridge ceanothus)

Plant description coming soon.
Ceanothus cordulatus  mountain whitethorn
More information »

Ceanothus cordulatus

(mountain whitethorn)

Plant description coming soon.
Ceanothus cuneatus  buckbrush
More information »

Ceanothus cuneatus

(buckbrush)

One of California's most widespread species offering a variety of forms. Typically buckbrush grows as an arching shrub growing 4-6 ft. or more tall and wide with small, thick, leathery leaves. Flowers can range from white to lavender to purple and are produced in small tight clusters in early spring. When in full bloom, the powerfully sweet scent of the flowers engulfs the visiting hiker. An excellent choice for hot dry conditions and difficult sites where it will grow in full sun with little to no water once established. Valuable addition to the habitat garden where it provides food and cover for a wide array of wildlife, birds, bees and butterflies. Said to be deer resistant.

More information »

Ceanothus cuneatus - flat form

(prostrate buckbrush)

This unusual form of the ubiquitous buckbrush comes to us from Yerba Buena Nursery. Reaches a height of only 1 - 2 ft. and spreads out to 6 ft. or more. Pale blue flowers appear in early spring and perfume the air with their sweet fragrance. Bees and butterflies are drawn to the flowers while birds enjoy the seeds which follow. An excellent groundcover for hot, dry banks requiring no irrigation once established. Needs full sun and good drainage. Likely to be deer resistant.

Pages

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Z