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Arctostaphylos auriculata

(Mount Diablo manzanita)

From the rocky slopes of Mount Diablo comes this rare and delightful manzanita. Smallish, fuzzy, grey leaves densely cover the branches over mahogany-red trunks. Late winter brings flowers ranging in color from pink to white.  This species grows slowly and densely to about 5 or 6 ft. tall and at least as wide. Needs full sun. Make sure to provide excellent drainage and little to no irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos bakeri 'Louis Edmunds' Baker's manzanita
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Arctostaphylos bakeri 'Louis Edmunds'

(Baker's manzanita)

A beautiful and durable upright manzanita reaching 5 - 6 ft. tall and wide. This species is native to Sonoma Co. where it is considered very rare and threatened by development. Handsome gray-green foliage with wonderful purplish-brown trunks contrast nicely with showy clusters of pink urn-shaped flowers in spring. Great for sunny areas where it endures heat and drought but enjoys an occasional deep watering. The manzanita berries can attract mockingbirds, robins, and cedar waxwings. It provides low shrubby cover for quail and wren-tits and its flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds.
Arctostaphylos canescens  hoary manzanita
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Arctostaphylos canescens

(hoary manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos columbiana  hairy manzanita
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Arctostaphylos columbiana

(hairy manzanita)

From Northern California’s coastline and outer Coast Ranges comes one of the largest of all manzanitas. This stately large shrub can reach well over 15 ft. tall, often developing a contorted shape with age. The large, gray-green leaves contrast well with the burnished, rust-red trunks.  Clusters of white flowers emerge in spring followed by matte-red fruits. This is THE upright manzanita for coastal areas with good drainage. Provide full sun and no irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos cruzensis  Arroyo de la Cruz manzanita
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Arctostaphylos cruzensis

(Arroyo de la Cruz manzanita)

This rare, ground-hugging manzanita comes from the San Luis Obispo coast. Features grey-green, wedge-shaped leaves and soft pink flowers in the winter. Its distinctive creeping habit makes it ideal for crawling over walls or lining walkways. Provide full sun to light shade and moderate to infrequent irrigation once established. Good in containers.
Arctostaphylos densiflora   Vine Hill manzanita
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Arctostaphylos densiflora

(Vine Hill manzanita)

One of California's rarest natives, this is the pure, true species. Exists only in a very small preserve in western Sonoma Co.. Distinctive for the profusion of beautiful pink to white urn-shaped blossoms they produce in winter and small, shiny bright green leaves. Variable in height but typically grows 3 ft. tall by 6 ft. wide. Does best in its native Sebastopol sandy soils with full sun to light shade and occasional to no summer irrigation.
Arctostaphylos densiflora 'James West' Vine Hill manzanita
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Arctostaphylos densiflora 'James West'

(Vine Hill manzanita)

This wonderful, drought tolerant, low growing manzanita from Sonoma County appears in form and other details to be a selection of the pure species of the very rare Vine Hill Manzanita. It is a very choice cultivar, seldom available in the trade. Grows 18 - 24 inches by 6 ft. in ten years and flowers from January through March with thick heads of shell pink flowers. Good drainage, as with all manzanitas and occasional to no irrigation once established. Full sun.
Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Bert Johnson' Little Sur manzanita
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Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Bert Johnson'

(Little Sur manzanita)

Choice, low growing manzanita introduced by the Tilden Botanic Garden.  Dense, mounding or cascading habit growing to around a foot tall by 6 ft. wide with small dark green leaves and bronzy new growth.  Not as fast growing as 'Carmel Sur'. Clusters of tiny pink to white urn-shaped flowers in winter attract hummingbirds and are followed by handsome cinnamon colored little apple-shaped fruits. Excellent cascading over walls, rocks, or containers in sun to light shade.  This manzanita has proven adaptable and fairly garden tolerant putting up with heavy soils and more summer water than many.  Full sun along the coast with light shade in hot inland sites.  Drought tolerant once established but appreciates occasional summer water.  
Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Big Sur' Little Sur manzanita
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Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Big Sur'

(Little Sur manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Carmel Sur' Little Sur manzanita
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Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Carmel Sur'

(Little Sur manzanita)

Perhaps the fastest growing variety of this species. Attractive gray-green foliage with a dense, spreading habit under 1 ft. tall and 6 ft. across. Light pink flowers appear in winter but are few and infrequent. A handsome alternative to other groundcover manzanitas.  More drought and heat tolerant than the bearberries and 'Emerald Carpet'. Likes full sun but may enjoy a little afternoon shade in especially hot inland sites. 
Arctostaphylos franciscana  Franciscan manzanita
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Arctostaphylos franciscana

(Franciscan manzanita)

This distinctive clone of the very rare franciscan manzanita displays luxuriant growth of shiny, dark green leaves spreading fairly quickly to form a dense drift up to eight ft wide and 2 ft tall. An excellent groundcover similar in appearance to A. uva-ursi but more drought tolerant and somewhat taller. A good manzanita for serpentine but still does well in other soils. Produces a modest display of pinkish white flowers in winter. Plant in full sun but light shade is fine especially in hotter climates. Requires moderate to occasional irrigation once established.

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Arctostaphylos gabilanensis

(Gabilan Mountains manzanita)

This extremely rare and threatened species wasn’t discovered until the early part of the 21st century, making it the newest species of manzanita to be identified. Not only is it very rare, but it is also extremely beautiful, featuring large, wedge-shaped, fuzzy, grey leaves and new growth flushed rosy-pink. Smooth, burgundy bark clothes the contoured branches which support clusters of whitish flowers in mid-winter, followed by red fruits in the summer. This slow growing shrub will eventually reach a height of 6 ft. or more with a broader width. Provide full sun. Needs decent drainage and will be very drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos glandulosa  Eastwood manzanita
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Arctostaphylos glandulosa

(Eastwood manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos glandulosa f. repens 'Mount Vision' Eastwood manzanita
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Arctostaphylos glandulosa f. repens 'Mount Vision'

(Eastwood manzanita)

Found only in the Bishop pine forest of the Point Reyes Peninsula, the form repens has a low and mounding habit. This particular selection was picked for it’s exceptionally compact and creeping nature and large, gray-green leaves. Clusters of white flowers hang from branch tips in early winter. While slower growing than most other groundcover manzanitas, this cultivar will eventually reach about 6 ft wide with a height of about 1 ft. 'Mount Vision' is best planted as a specimen rather than in mass plantings. Very drought tolerant once established with full sun to light shade. An excellent container plant.
Arctostaphylos glauca  bigberry manzanita
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Arctostaphylos glauca

(bigberry manzanita)

Description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos hookeri 'Monterey Carpet' Monterey manzanita
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Arctostaphylos hookeri 'Monterey Carpet'

(Monterey manzanita)

Evergreen, creeping manzanita less than 1 ft. tall with small, deep green leaves. Dark red branches tend to root and increase its spread to 8 ft. or so wide. Small clusters of white flowers appear in late winter to early spring. Prefers a little shade inland. Drought tolerant but enjoys occasional irrigation in inland sites. Perfect under deciduous oaks or tall pines. Works well in spots where the creeping branches can spill over an edge, creating a cascade effect. 

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Arctostaphylos hookeri 'Wayside'

(Monterey manzanita)

A robust selection of the Monterey manzanita with dense branches growing to 3 ft. high by 8 ft or more broad. Attractive upsweeping crooked trunks with little white flowers and small deep green leaves. Occurring on open hills around Monterey Bay. Despite it's somewhat coastal origin, this selection tolerates, sun, heat and drought quite well. That being said, it will also accept occasional irrigation and light shade. A very useful plant for covering large sunny banks with poor soil.
Arctostaphylos hookeri ssp. hearstiorum  Hearst's manzanita
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Arctostaphylos hookeri ssp. hearstiorum

(Hearst's manzanita)


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Arctostaphylos hookeri x pajaroensis - Tilden form

(manzanita)

We thank Tilden Botanic Garden for this natural cross from the Pajaro River area of Monterey Bay. While similar to ‘Sunset’, this selection has somewhat denser foliage and thicker, more rigid stems. A vigorous and disease resistant manzanita with dark green, wedge-shaped leaves and bronzy-red new growth. In late winter, small, whitish flowers draw native bees into the garden for nectar. The slightly shaggy, cinnamon-colored bark covers the contorted trunks to great effect. Reaches up to a height of about 5 or 6 ft. and a width of around 7 ft. Provide full sun to part shade. Is more tolerant of heavy soils than many manzanitas and will accept moderate to infrequent irrigation in the garden.
Arctostaphylos manzanita  common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita

(common manzanita)

Good subject for a dry sunny bank where this picturesque native shrub can develop its beautiful form of sinewy branches and smooth red-brown bark. Growing 8-12 ft. tall by 6-10 ft. wide or even larger with time. Flowers heavily in the spring with white to soft pink urn-shaped flowers followed by clusters of tiny apple-shaped fruits. An excellent habitat plant providing food and cover for a wide array of birds. The flowers are an excellent early nectar source for bees and hummingbirds. Very drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Austin Griffiths' manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Austin Griffiths'

(manzanita)

Believed to be a cross between 'Sentinel' and 'Dr. Hurd', this hybrid was discovered by Native Sons Nursery and named in honor of a valued volunteer. Glossy green leaves and dark maroon-brown bark form an attractive backdrop for large clusters of soft pink flowers.  The blooms appear in early winter, providing a valuable nectar source for hummingbirds and bees. Over time, this upright manzanita can reach a height of up to 10 feet and a width of 6 ft. More garden tolerant than 'Dr. Hurd', 'Austin Griffiths' accepts occasional irrigation but can be drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Bates' Yellow' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Bates' Yellow'

(common manzanita)

Plant description coming soon!
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Dr. Hurd' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Dr. Hurd'

(common manzanita)

This selection of the common manzanita features large, rounded leaves of a distinctive pale green coloration. Becomes a large shrub or small tree, reaching up to 15 ft. tall with a beautiful mahogany-red trunk and a broad, round form.  Showy large clusters of white urn-shaped flowers in January, followed by burnished red berries. Prefers full sun, decent drainage and no irrigation once established. 

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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Frei Road'

(common manzanita)

Large clusters of soft pink flowers and a contoured, open shape distinguish this West Sonoma County manzanita from its kin. Smooth, burgundy bark clothes the meandering branches offsetting the green, pointed leaves. Reaches a height of 8 ft. or more and a width of at least 6ft. May be pruned to create a more upright habit. This selection is more tolerant of irrigation and heavier soils than many inland manzanitas and is also more disease resistant. Provide full sun and occasional to no irrigation once established.

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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Garrison Canyon'

(common manzanita)

This large, tree-like selection comes from Garrison Canyon on Pepperwood Preserve above Mark West Springs. Big, round, pewter-green leaves adorn branches covered in smooth mahogany bark. Especially large clusters of soft-pink flowers emerge in late winter and are followed in summer by “little apple” fruits. In time, this selection may reach up to 15 ft. tall and wide. Provide full sun. Very drought tolerant once established.

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