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Ribes malvaceum  chaparral currant
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Ribes malvaceum

(chaparral currant)

Chaparral currant is a tough and durable native shrub 4 to 6 ft. tall. This deciduous shrub will grow in full sun to light shade and is quite drought tolerant. Flowers early, often midwinter with dangling clusters of pink blossoms. Good early nectar source for hummingbirds. Berries attract many birds including grosbeak and mockingbirds.

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Ribes malvaceum 'Cupertino Rose'

(chaparral currant)

Chaparral currant's flowers can range from white to pink to nearly red in color. This selection carries flower clusters that were the darkest to be found in this population from the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mts. west of Cupertino. The buds are dark pink and the dangling racemes when fully open read medium pink. Deciduous shrub 4-6 ft tall and wide with a very early bloom season often beginning in November, which provides an excellent early source of nectar for hummingbirds. The pendulous clusters of berries that follow are relished by birds. Tolerates full sun along the coast with some shade inland and occasional to little summer water. 
Ribes malvaceum 'Dancing Tassels' chaparral currant
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Ribes malvaceum 'Dancing Tassels'

(chaparral currant)

A dazzling selection by Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden from San Clemente Island. Blooming in winter over a long period with the longest dangling flower clusters we’ve seen in the species. Pendulous flower clusters are dusty pink in bud, opening to white and soft pink when fully open. Growing 6 ft. or more tall, this deciduous, vase shaped shrub has gray-green foliage with a pungent resinous fragrance. Peeling red-brown bark and clusters of blue-black berries add to its beauty and appeal. Chaparral currant blooms earlier and is more sun and drought tolerant than the popular pink flowering currant, Ribes sanguineum glutinosum. Plant in full sun to light shade with little to no water once established. An outstanding early nectar source for hummingbirds.
Ribes menziesii  canyon gooseberry
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Ribes menziesii

(canyon gooseberry)

A gooseberry of low elevation forests, growing to around 4-5 ft. tall with an open, arching habit. Bright green scalloped leaves with pale undersides are set on spiny stems. The charming flowers are small but sweet, with maroon sepals and white petals dangling beneath the thorny branches offering nectar to hummingbirds. The spiny red fruits that follow are decorative and attractive to birds. Often found on the edge or in openings of forests, the canyon gooseberry does best with light shade. It is drought tolerant especially near the coast, though it appreciates occasional summer water. An excellent habitat plant that provides shelter and food for a wide variety of birds.  
Ribes odoratum 'Crandall' clove-scented currant
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Ribes odoratum 'Crandall'

(clove-scented currant)

Native to the Midwest and high plains this shrub looks similar to our native Ribes aureum. Growing 4 - 6 ft. tall and wide with light green, lobed leaves on spineless branches. Fragrant yellow flower clusters have a spicy carnation-like fragrance and are followed by abundant and flavorful black fruits. The rich, sweet-tart fruits are similar to the European black currant and can be used in jams and jellies. Eye-catching red leaves in the fall. Plant in full sun to partial shade with moderate to occasional summer water.
Ribes roezlii  Sierra gooseberry
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Ribes roezlii

(Sierra gooseberry)

The Sierra gooseberry's natural range is far beyond the Sierras, with varieties growing in the mountains of northern, southern and central California. Forms an arching shrub of thorny branches with pretty, little scalloped leaves, 2 - 4 ft. tall and wide. Pendant flowers are made up of burgundy-red sepals and small white to pink petals with protruding stamens, looking something like miniature fuchsias. Custom built for hummingbirds. In spring, showy, rounded fruits covered with prickles follow the flowers, starting out green and ripening to red, spiny globes which are relished by birds. This charming shrub is a lovely addition to the woodland garden where they receive light to moderate shade and are drought tolerant once established. Needs good drainage.
Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Cal Flora White' white flowering current
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Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Cal Flora White'

(white flowering current)

A Cal Flora Nursery original, a chance seedling in our nursery landscape. We watched this seedling develop into an elegant, seven foot, vase shaped shrub. The five inch pendulous racemes dangle from the branch tips and are pure white. Give flowering currants light or part shade except along the immediate coast where they grow in full sun. Moderate to occasional water once established. Hummingbird and bumblebee favorite. Birds enjoy the fruits.  
Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Claremont' pink flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Claremont'

(pink flowering currant)

Distinctive for its extra long, pendulous racemes of pink flowers with white centers. This Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden selection of the pink flowering currant is particularly vigorous, featuring abundant floral displays in early spring. Will attain a height and spread of 6 - 8 ft over time.  Best with light shade and a little summer water. Important early nectar source for bumblebees and hummingbirds. Berries attract many birds including grosbeak and mockingbirds.
Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Heart's Delight' pink flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Heart's Delight'

(pink flowering currant)

A coastal Marin County selection of one of the West's choicest native shrubs. Deciduous, grows 6 ft. tall or more. In early spring it produces long drooping racemes of deep rosy-pink blossoms. Best with light shade inland, humusy soil and some summer water. Hummingbirds love the flowers and the berries attract many birds including robins, grosbeak and mockingbirds.
Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Inverness White' white flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Inverness White'

(white flowering currant)

Selected by Roger Raiche on Inverness Ridge in Marin County. Distinguished from other white flowering cultivars in that the pure white blossoms develop a rosy cast as they fade. Deciduous shrub about 6 ft. tall by 6 ft. wide. Best with a little shade, woodsy soil and a little summer water. Berries attract many birds including grosbeak and mockingbirds.
Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Monte Bello' pink flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Monte Bello'

(pink flowering currant)

This Cal Flora introduction was discovered in the hills west of Cupertino in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Long clusters of deep pink flowers make this selection of the pink-flowering currant stand out from other forms. In late winter and spring the flowers emerge on bare stems followed by rounded, maple-like leaves. This deciduous shrub has a vase-like shape, reaching a height of up to 10 ft. over time and a width of at least 6 ft. Provide full sun near the coast and light shade inland. Needs moderate to occasional irrigation once established. A great plant for hummingbirds and a wide array of pollinators. Birds enjoy the fruits.
Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Tranquillon Ridge' pink flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. glutinosum 'Tranquillon Ridge'

(pink flowering currant)

A Native Sons Nursery selection from Tranquillon Ridge in Santa Barbara County, found growing under a canopy of Bishop pines. Super vigorous and very large, up to 10 ft. tall with extremely long racemes of dark pink flowers in the early spring. The racemes have an appealing shape, tapering to a point at the end of their long pendant flower clusters. Best with some shade even in coastal gardens where it’s drought tolerant. Occasional deep waterings are best in hot inland areas. Berries attract many birds including grosbeak and mockingbirds.    
Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum 'Barrie Coate' red flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum 'Barrie Coate'

(red flowering currant)

This selection of red flowering currant is a knock out in bloom. An early bloomer often starting in February with short racemes of nodding clusters of very deep rosy-pink, nearly red blossoms. Clusters of blue-black fruits follow and are enjoyed by birds. This deciduous shrub will grow 6 foot tall by 4 foot wide. Plant in sun to light shade with afternoon shade in hot regions and moderate to occasional summer water. An excellent early source of nectar for hummingbirds.
Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum 'Brocklebankii' golden-leaved red flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum 'Brocklebankii'

(golden-leaved red flowering currant)

A distinctive shrub with gorgeous golden foliage on 5 ft. tall stems. Pendulous racemes of pink flowers in early spring just as the leaves are emerging are a favorite of hummingbirds. The leaves will scorch in the hot sun so part shade is best, especially during the hottest time of day. This cultivar prefers even moisture, recenting drought stress. 
Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum 'Elk River Red' red flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum 'Elk River Red'

(red flowering currant)

This selection of the red flowering currant is from the Pacific Northwest. A deciduous shrub growing 6 ft. or more tall. Early spring brings eye catching bright rosy-red blossoms in drooping clusters. A wonderful early nectar source for hummingbirds. Plant in cool sun or light shade inland with occasional to moderate summer water. Berries attract many birds including grosbeak and mockingbirds.

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Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum 'King Edward VII'

(red flowering currant)

Deep pink flower tassels adorn this native deciduous currant in early spring, providing a vivid splash of color to an awakening landscape. The pendulous flower clusters are followed by scalloped, deep green leaves, creating a useful texture to pair with Iris, Ceanothus and ferns. ‘King Edward VII’ has a very upright vase shape, reaching between 5 to 7 ft. tall and 4 to 5 ft. wide. Provide full sun in cooler climates and a little shade elsewhere, especially in the afternoon. Needs moderate to occasional irrigation. The flowers provide an excellent nectar source for bees, butterflies and hummingbirds while the deep purple fruits are enjoyed by birds. A sturdy selection.
Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum  'White Icicle' white flowering currant
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Ribes sanguineum v. sanguineum 'White Icicle'

(white flowering currant)

This selection of flowering currant is from the University of British Columbia Botanic Garden. Flowers in early spring are pure white on long racemes. Foliage is bright green. Compact habit, 6 - 8 ft. tall. Light shade in hot regions with occasional summer water. Berries attract many birds including grosbeak and mockingbirds.
Ribes speciosum  fuchsia-flowered gooseberry
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Ribes speciosum

(fuchsia-flowered gooseberry)

One of California’s showiest gooseberry, blooming in late winter - early spring with charming bright red, pendant, fuchsia-like flowers. The thorny branches are arching and grow 4 - 6 ft. tall and wide. Best with light shade and needs no irrigation once established. Occasional summer water keeps most of the leaves green through the summer, but will go summer dormant with dry conditions. An excellent choice for under native oaks. The flowers attract hummingbirds and the spiny fruits attract many birds including grosbeak and mockingbirds. Deer resistant.
Ribes viburnifolium  Catalina perfume
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Ribes viburnifolium

(Catalina perfume)

Native to Santa Catalina Island, this Ribes is unique for the genus, being evergreen and low growing. Leathery, dark green, glossy leaves with a spicy fragrance on red stems forms a spreading shrubby groundcover to 2- 3 ft. tall. Small clusters of interesting star-shaped maroon flowers decorate the arching branches in late winter to early spring. Requires part shade and is drought tolerant once established. Adaptable to a variety of soil types including heavy clay. Tip pruning is recommended to encourage a dense growth habit. Deer resistant.
Ribes x gordonianum  currant
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Ribes x gordonianum

(currant)

A special hybrid flowering currant created in England by Donald Beaton in 1837 between our western U.S. Ribes sanguineum and the central U.S. Ribes odoratum. The fragrant flowers hang in dense dangling clusters in late spring and produce a dazzling color display with warm coppery red on the outside and yellow on the inside. The green maple-like leaves are deciduous.  Robust and spreading, this currant grows to about 6 ft. tall and 8 ft. wide.  Provide full sun to light shade and give moderate water.  
Romneya coulteri  matilija poppy
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Romneya coulteri

(matilija poppy)

A shrub-like perennial. Extremely vigorous once established. Flowers crinkly white petals with yellow centers (fried eggs) at the top of long, gray-foliaged stems. Plant where its size and spreading won't be a problem and prune severely in winter. Height 4 -7 feet. Full sun. Drought and deer tolerant.
Rosa californica  California wild rose
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Rosa californica

(California wild rose)

Thicket forming deciduous shrub native to moist places throughout the state. Good screen or living fence. 3 - 5 ft. tall and spreading. Fragrant single pink blossoms followed by attractive red fruits. Provides erosion control as well as food and cover for wildlife. Prefers full sun and moist soils.
Rosa gymnocarpa  wood rose
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Rosa gymnocarpa

(wood rose)

Delicate, native rose of woodlands, growing 3 - 4 ft. tall. Sprinkled with sweetly fragrant single pink flowers followed by small red rose hips. Best in woodsy shade where it tolerates drought. Bees, butterflies and other pollinators are attracted to rose blossoms and the fruits are enjoyed by birds.
Rosa nutkana  Nootka rose
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Rosa nutkana

(Nootka rose)

Named for the Nootka Sound in Alaska where it was originally described,California is the southern end of this shrub's range. Forms prickly thickets to 6 feet tall with light green foliage. Super fragrant, 2-3 inch single pink flowers appear in summer followed by showy red hips.Favors moist sites in full sun to light shade.Rose thickets provide excellent habitat value, offering food and cover for birds and small mammals,pollen and nectar for many beneficial insects as well as a larval food source for a number of butterflies.
Rosa spithamea  Sonoma rose
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Rosa spithamea

(Sonoma rose)

Description coming soon!

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